For more info about Omnidawn click here

 

 

 

 

 

If you are a poet in need of a free entry see guideline 12 below.

Four Omnidawn Poetry Contests 2021–2022:

    Current Contest:

            Poetry Chapbook Contest—$1,000 (May 1–Jun 14, 2021)

                  For Guidelines and Information on How to Submit click here

                  To receive email deadline alerts for this contest click here

    Upcoming Poetry Contests 2021:

            Omnidawn Open (Poetry Book Contest)—$3,000 (Jul 1–Aug 16, 2021)

            First/Second Poetry Book Contest—$3,000 (Jan 1–Feb 14, 2022)

            Single Poem Broadside Poetry Contest—$1,000 (Mar 1–Apr 18, 2022)

            To receive email deadline alerts for these poetry contests click here

                For information about Omnidawn's Fabulist Fiction Novelette/Chapbook Contest click here: http://www.omnidawn.com/contest/fiction/

 

For Information on the March–April 2022 Single Poem Broadside Contest click here

 

Information on Omnidawn's Book & Chapbook Competitions is Immediately Below

Essential Information

The winner of each of Omnidawn's poetry book and chapbook contests wins an immediate cash prize ($3,000 for the 1st/2nd Book and Open Contest, $1,000 for the Chapbook Contest), publication of the book by Omnidawn with a full color cover (unless the author prefers black and white), 100 free copies of the winning book, and extensive display advertising and publicity. Large display ads will appear in Poets & Writers Magazine, American Poets Magazine, Rain Taxi Review of Books and other publications. Our winning books are highly regarded in the book publishing and academic worlds, and our extensive publicity results in increased exposure and reviews in major print and online publications. Winning books have been reviewed in major print publications including Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, Booklist, Colorado Review, Boston Review, Harvard Review, Kenyan Review, The Huffington Post, American Book Review, and major online publications including The Volta, Constant Critic, The Rumpus, Verse, Jacket2, and The Drunken Boat. Two recent winning books from the Omnidawn Open contest have gone on to become finalists for the National Book Award, and one of those books went on to win the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award. If you are a poet in need of a free entry see guideline 12 below because Omnidawn offers 40 free entry passes at the beginning of each poetry contest. We encourage, but do not require, prize winners of the poetry competitions to submit their subsequent manuscripts to Omnidawn for publication. Prize winners who have published their second full-length book with Omnidawn include Michelle Taransky (2008 First/Second Book Contest), Zach Savich (2010 Poetry Chapbook Contest), Kelli Anne Noftle (2010 First/Second Book Contest), kate pringle (2011 First Book Contest), and Angela Hume (2012 Poetry Chapbook Contest).

Guidelines That Are the Same for All Book and Chapbook Contests. All three Omnidawn poetry book competitions have very similar guidelines and submission procedures. The guidelines and requirements that are the same for all contests are as follows:

  1. Omnidawn poetry editors seek a wide range of styles, approaches, forms, diversities, and aesthetics to send to the judge (for example: lyric, prose poems, experimental, etc.).
  2. There are no citizenship requirements or limitations. Postal and online submissions are accepted from around the world.
  3. Manuscripts must be in English, although it is perfectly acceptable to include some text in other languages.
  4. Manuscript submissions for all contests must be original. (If you include quotes from other works in your manuscript, please be sure they are clearly attributed to the author either on the same page or in a “Notes” section at the back of the manuscript.)
  5. Manuscripts must be previously unpublished, although individual poems in a manuscript are still eligible for this contest if they have been previously published in print or web magazines, journals, anthologies, or on a personal web site.
  6. Simultaneous submissions to other contests and multiple submissions to this or other Omnidawn contests are perfectly acceptable. You DO NOT need to notify us if your manuscript is taken elsewhere. Instead, we will verify with you that the manuscript is still available if you are close to being chosen as a winner.
  7. If you are submitting a poetry manuscript that includes photographs or other graphic images please request additional guidelines by sending an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com.
  8. All Omnidawn contests are Identity-Hidden (formerly referred to as a "blind contest"). For the Identity-Hidden contests if you use your name in your poetry please request additional guidelines for using a pseudonym by sending an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com. You can submit manuscripts that contain identifying information, but please be aware that such information will be removed from manuscripts before they are passed on to our readers and the judge.
  9. Revisions are not allowed to a manuscript after it has been submitted to the contest. However, the winning poet will have time to revise the manuscript before publication. We do reserve the right to get approval from the judge if those revisions are significant. For further details click here.
  10. Past or present “students,” “colleagues,” or “close friends” of the judge are NOT ELIGIBLE. For the purpose of this contest the following definitions apply: “Students” are defined as someone who has taken one or more semesters or quarter courses from the judge, but we do not consider someone who has taken only a weekend or week long workshop to be a “student” of the judge. “Colleagues” include someone who has worked with the judge, usually in the same department at a university or college, but someone who has worked in a different unrelated department at the same university or college and has had very little contact with the judge is not considered a “colleague”. A “close friend” is defined as someone who has met with the judge socially, for instance for a private dinner. Someone who knows the judge, but only meets and greets the judge at readings and other events is not considered a “close friend.” Once you have had a “student,” “colleague,” or “close friend” relationship with the judge, even if it was many years ago, you are ineligible for this contest.
  11. ALSO NOT ELIGIBLE are translations; collaborations by more than one author on the poetry (although photos or graphics in a manuscript can be created by other individuals); Omnidawn past and present staff and interns; authors of books Omnidawn has published, and winners of previous Omnidawn BOOK or CHAPBOOK contests. Winners of Omnidawn's Broadside Contest are still eligible to enter and win Omnidawn BOOK or CHAPBOOK contests.
  12. IF YOU ARE A POET IN NEED and cannot afford the entry fee there is an alternative: Omnidawn now offers 40 free entries for each poetry contest on a first come, first serve basis. These free entries are available to poets in need around the world. During the first week that these become available we will offer 20 to poets with a U.S. address, and 20 to poets with an address outside the U.S., so if you are one of the first 20 U.S. poets or one of the first 20 non-U.S. poets to apply you will receive a free pass. After the first week any remaining free entries will be available to poets without limitations based on whether the poet is inside or outside the U.S. You can then use the pass at any time before the contest deadline to enter the contest for free. For full details click here.

Errors in Your Submission. If our staff find a serious error in your entry (your manuscript file won't open, is locked so we cannot remove identifying info, is unreadable, or is missing pages, or your credit card info is incorrect or your payment is missing, etc.) we will contact you to obtain a correction at no cost to you, so your error will not disqualify you. Nor will a few smaller errors in your manuscript, including spelling, punctuation, formatting, typographic errors, or the inclusion of your name or other identifying info in your manuscript disqualify you or reduce your chances of winning. (We fully understand that such errors sometimes occur for everyone, and that these can be easily corrected later.)

Differences Among the Three Book Contests. The differences between the three book contests are the contest dates, the judge, the dollar amount of the prize, the reading fee, the manuscript page limit, an optional Omnidawn book offer, and for one contest only, the First/Second Poetry Book Contest, a limit on the number of previously published full-size poetry books by a submitting poet. These differences are described immediately below, under the "Current Contest" and "Upcoming Contests" headings.

 

If you are a poet in need of a free entry see guideline 12 above.

 

Current Poetry Contest

2021 Poetry Chapbook Contest ($1,000 & Publication)     May 1–June 14, 2021            Judge: Rae Armantrout

This contest is open to all writers worldwide with no limitations on the amount of poetry a writer has published. We recommend submissions should be 20–40 pages of poetry, not including front and back matter. (Keep in mind that this is intended to fit in a 5.5 x 7 inch published chapbook of approximately 48 pages or less, although you can submit on standard 8.5 x 11 inch pages, and we will format to fit the smaller size.) Colleagues, students, and close friends of the judge, Ray Armantrout, are not eligible. As part of the condition for winning this prize we ask that the winning poet not include any of the poems in the winning chapbook in another published book for at least one year after Omnidawn publishes the winning chapbook. Online entries must be received and postal entries must be postmarked between May 1 and June 14, 2021 at midnight Pacific Standard Time. Reading fee is $18. For $2 extra to cover shipping cost, entrants who provide a U.S. mailing address may choose to receive this contest's winning chapbook or any current Omnidawn chapbook. A complete list of all current Omnidawn chapbook titles is available at http://www.omnidawn.com/product-category/pocket-series. (Established in 2010, this contest was one of Omnidawn's first book contests.) The 2021 winner will be announced to our Email list and on this web page in December 2021, and we expect to publish the winning chapbook in October 2022. To view details below about previous winners of the Poetry Chapbook Contest click here.

ALL ESSENTIAL INFORMATION ABOUT THIS CONTEST IS DESCRIBED ABOVE. If you want to enter you have three options:

  1. If you want to read helpful additional details below, which are virtually identical for all Omnidawn poetry book contests, and then go to the postal or online submission procedures, you can: Click here for helpful additional details.
  2. OR, you can go directly to the concise POSTAL submission procedure below by clicking here.
  3. OR, you can go directly to the concise ONLINE submission procedure on the submission web page by clicking here, or paste the following link into your browser:     www.omnidawn.com/submissions1

OR, IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE ALERTS ABOUT UPCOMING CONTEST DEADLINES (and, if you choose, other Omnidawn emails), you can: Click here to add yourself to our mailing list. (Your email address will not be shared with anyone, and you can easily remove yourself from the mailing list at any time.)

 

 

Upcoming Poetry Contests

2021 Omnidawn Open (Poetry Book Contest) ($3,000 & Publication)      July 1–August 16, 2021      Judge: John Lau

This contest is open to all writers worldwide with no limitations on the amount of poetry a writer has published. We recommend submissions should be 40–120 pages of poetry, not including front and back matter. (Most manuscripts we receive are 40-80 pages long.) Colleagues, students, and close friends of the judge, John Lau, are not eligible. Online entries must be received and postal entries must be postmarked between July 1 and August 16, 2021 at midnight Pacific Daylight Time. Reading fee is $27. For $3 extra to cover shipping cost, entrants who provide a U.S. mailing address may choose to receive this contest's winning book or any current Omnidawn book. A complete list of all current Omnidawn poetry books is available at www.omnidawn.com/titles The 2021 winner will be announced to our Email list and on this web page in February 2022, and we expect to publish the winning book in April 2023. To view details below about previous winners of the Omnidawn Open click here.

If you would like to receive information about upcoming deadlines (and, if you choose, other Omnidawn emails), you can click here to add yourself to our mailing list. (Your email address will not be shared with anyone, and you can easily remove yourself from the mailing list at any time.) OR, click here for helpful additional details and submission procedures below that are virtually identical for all Omnidawn Contests.

2022 First/Second Poetry Book Contest ($3,000 & Publication)     Jan 1–Feb 14, 2022         Judge: Mary Jo Bang

This contest is open to writers worldwide who have either never published a full-length book of poetry, or who have published only one full-length book of poetry, so that the winning book would become a poet's first or second published full-length book of poetry. Writers who have published two or more full-length books of poetry are NOT eligible. (Chapbooks do not count and non-poetry books do not count.) We recommend submissions should be 40–120 pages of poetry, not including front and back matter. (Most manuscripts we receive are 40-70 pages long.) Colleagues, students, and close friends of the judge, Mary Jo Bang, are not eligible. Online entries must be received and postal entries must be postmarked between January 1 and February 14, 2022 at midnight Pacific Daylight Time. Reading fee is $27. For $3 extra to cover shipping cost, entrants who provide a U.S. mailing address may choose to receive this contest's winning book or any current Omnidawn book. A complete list of all current Omnidawn poetry books is available at www.omnidawn.com/titles (Established in 2008, this contest was Omnidawn's first book contest.) The 2022 winner will be announced to our Email list and on this web page in September 2022, and we expect to publish the winning book in October 2023. To view details below about previous winners of the First/Second Book Contest click here.

If you would like to receive information about upcoming deadlines (and, if you choose, other Omnidawn emails), you can click here to add yourself to our mailing list. (Your email address will not be shared with anyone, and you can easily remove yourself from the mailing list at any time.) OR, click here for helpful additional details and submission procedures below that are virtually identical for all Omnidawn Contests.

2022 Single Poem Broadside Contest ($1,000 & Broadside Publication)     March 1–April 18, 2022. Judge: To Be Determined      For full details click here

If you would like to receive information about upcoming deadlines (and, if you choose, other Omnidawn emails), you can click here to add yourself to our mailing list. (Your email address will not be shared with anyone, and you can easily remove yourself from the mailing list at any time.) OR, click here for helpful additional details and submission procedures below that are virtually identical for all Omnidawn Contests.

 

The additional details below apply to the current Omnidawn Poetry Chapbook Contest so if you are only interested in the current contest you do not need to read the remainder of this paragraph. If you are interested in the upcoming First/Second Poetry Book Contest or Omnidawn Open (Poetry Book Contest) there will be a difference in the reading fees and optional book offer as follows: For the current Poetry Chapbook Contest the reading fee is $18, and if you have or can provide a U.S. mailing address, for an additional $2 for shipping cost (a total of $20) you can choose to receive the winning CHAPBOOK or any Omnidawn CHAPBOOK of your choice. For the upcoming First/Second Poetry Book Contest or Omnidawn Open Poetry Book Contest the reading fee will be $27, and if you have or can provide a U.S. mailing address, for an additional $3 for shipping cost (a total of $30) you can choose to receive the winning book or any Omnidawn book of your choice. All other details below are identical for all three Omnidawn poetry book contests.

Additional Details for All Omnidawn Poetry Book Contests

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

The Most Important Requirements

If our staff find a serious error in your entry (your manuscript file won't open, is locked so we cannot remove identifying info, is unreadable, or is missing pages, or your credit card info is incorrect or your payment is missing, etc.) we will contact you to obtain a correction at no cost to you, so your error will not disqualify you. Smaller errors or deficiencies in your manuscript, including spelling, punctuation, formatting, typographical errors, coffee stains, or the inclusion of your name or other identifying info in a manuscript submitted to a Identity-Hidden contest will not disqualify you or reduce your chances of winning. (We do remove any identifying information from manuscripts before sending them to our readers.) We fully understand that such errors sometimes occur for everyone, and that these can be easily corrected later. The only really critical requirements are to:

  1. Check the eligibility requirements (described in the first section at the top of this web page titled "Essential Information for All Three Poetry Book Contests" and the paragraph for specific contests in the "Current Contest" or "Upcoming Contests" sections, also at the top of this web page).
  2. Make sure that you are fully satisfied with your manuscript (because revisions are not allowed during the contest).
  3. Submit your entry by the deadline.
  4. When submitting make sure that you have provided correct contact information so that we can reach you approximately 4 to 5 months after the contest closes. We urge you to include various means of contacting you, including as many phone numbers, email addresses, and postal addresses as you like. We will use all of these to contact you if necessary, but if we cannot reach you within a three week period, we will be unable to award you the prize. (For online entries these can be added to the "Comments" field. For postal entries these can be added to the title page along with your primary contact information.)
  5. If you provide an Email address (optional for postal entries, required for online entries) we will send you an Email to confirm we have received your entry, and for entries submitted online we will also check your contact information and your manuscript file and send you the last few lines of your manuscript so you know your manuscript has been received completely, and so you can resolve the problem at no cost to you if it has not. Additional details about these verification Emails are contained below in item number 12 of the online submission procedure and item number 6 of the postal submission procedure.

 

How We Judge

Omnidawn abides by The CLMP Code of Ethics. The Community of Literary Magazines and Presses, an organization of independent literary publishers, believes that ethical contests serve our shared goal: to connect writers and readers by publishing exceptional writing. We believe that intent to act ethically, clarity of guidelines, and transparency of process form the foundation of an ethical contest. To that end, we agree to 1) conduct our contests as ethically as possible and to address any unethical behavior on the part of our staff, editors, or judges; 2) to provide clear and specific contest guidelines — defining conflict of interest for all parties involved; and 3) to make the mechanics of our selection process available to the public. This Code recognizes that different contest models produce different results, but that each model can be run ethically. We have adopted this Code to reinforce our integrity and dedication as a publishing community and to ensure that our contests contribute to a vibrant literary heritage.

All contests are Identity-Hidden (formerly known as blind) so any identifying information in your manuscript, including acknowledgements, will be removed from all manuscripts before they are sent to the editors who choose the semi-finalists to be sent to the judge. (For these Identity-Hidden contests if your name is an integral part of your poetry, please send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com to request guidelines for using a pseudonym in your manuscript. All manuscripts will be given a number to associate them with the contact information of their submitters. Any Omnidawn staff members who make contact with the entrants or who remove the identifying information from manuscripts are NOT involved in the reading or selection of manuscripts.

All manuscripts will then be read by at least two different Poetry Editors. For all contests only Omnidawn's Senior Poetry Editor, Managing Poetry Editor, and Poetry Editors will read submissions. (All Omnidawn Poetry Editors who read and select manuscripts to be sent to the judge are professional paid staff with MFA degrees in poetry. Interns and volunteers are not involved in the selection process.) These editors will not have access to the identities of the submitters. For the sake of avoiding any conflict of interest, if an editor believes that he/she recognizes the work of a colleague, student, or friend, then that manuscript is given to another editor. The editors then meet as a group to select the semi-finalists to be sent to the judge.

If the judge wishes to see additional manuscripts, she or he may request them; the judge is not, however, permitted to request specific manuscripts. Colleagues, students, and close friends of the judge are not eligible to compete. Past or present Omnidawn staff and interns and authors previously published by Omnidawn are also not eligible to compete. The judge is not allowed to choose manuscripts that present a conflict of interest.

 

The Meaning of the "Status" Field for Each Entry

Note that for entries received online for our book and chapbook contest the "status" field of your entry or entries will first indicate "received," and then change to "1st forward," "2nd forward," "3rd forward," etc., as readers write comments on each manuscript and forward the manuscripts with these comments to one another. Because these book and chapbook manuscripts are read over a period of months it becomes impossible for readers to remember what they like and do not like about a manuscript without writing extensive notes to be kept with these manuscripts. Writing these notes in the Submission Manager program is the best way to accumulate and forward these comments with each manuscript so they can be easily recalled during the final decision making process.

However, entries to the Broadside contest will always show a status of "received," and this will not change. This is because the first reading of these manuscripts takes place on one Saturday, and subsequent reads take place on the following Saturday, and it is easy for readers to remember what they like and do not like about any given poem. It is far more efficient in this case to download all the poems from the Submission Manager program, copy them to each readers computer, and not take the time to write and forward comments with each poem, so their status is never changed from "received."

Postal entries also only show as "received" and this status will not change. This is because it would be very time consuming to scan the paper copy of a manuscript into a digital file and uploading this to the Submission Manager program so that it could be kept with any reader's comments. It is much easier to simply write comments on the paper copy that has been received via postal mail, and to pass this among readers.

 

How and When We Announce the Winner and Finalists

Approximately five months after the contest ends, the judge selects the winner and five finalists and informs the Omnidawn staff, who then verify that the winner or finalists are not students, colleagues, or close friends of the judge. Omnidawn then notifies the winner and verifies that the requirements of the contest have been met. If so, a standard book contract is immediately mailed to the winner, and the finalists are also notified. When Omnidawn receives the signed contract back from the winner, a check for the full prize money is immediately mailed to the winner. As stated in the contract, the prize money ($1,000 for the Chapbook Prize and $3,000 for all other book contests) covers the royalties on the first 1,500 copies, with royalties to the author of twenty percent of Omnidawn's net receipts for sales of the book thereafter; the copyright will be registered in the name of the winning author; and all rights revert to the winning author if Omnidawn lets the book go out of print. At this point the winner and finalists are publicly announced in emails to all entrants who provided an email address, on the www.omnidawn.com web site, on social media, and large display ads are purchased announcing the winner and finalists in upcoming issues of Poets & Writers Magazine, American Poets Magazine and Rain Taxi Review of Books. The process of designing and producing the winning book and creating its publicity program, which usually takes about six months, starts immediately.

 

Revisions to the Winning Manuscript

The winning poet will have the opportunity to make revisions to the winning manuscript. However, significant revisions can result in a manuscript that is very different from the one the judge has chosen. Given that the judge's name is attached to the winning manuscript, it is only fair to the judge and to the spirit of the contest that revisions that have the potential to significantly change the meaning or effect of the manuscript must be approved by the judge.

In our experience the vast majority of the edits that winners have proposed are relatively small and do not change the manuscript significantly. It has been rare that we have felt a need to submit such changes to the judge for approval. If the judge does not approve the new manuscript and the winner agrees to publish the manuscript as it was originally entered in the contest that winning manuscript will remain the winner, but if publishing the manuscript without the poet’s new revisions is unacceptable to the poet, then the poet can choose to decline the prize.

We also do an extensive copy edit on the winning manuscript for punctuation, spelling, and grammatical errors, and the winning poet can choose to accept each item that is so edited or not, or to refuse all such copy edits if the winning poet chooses.

 

If you are a poet in need of a free entry

If you are a poet in need and cannot afford the entry fee there is an alternative: Omnidawn now offers 40 free entries for each poetry contest on a first come, first serve basis. These free entries are available to anyone around the world. Initially 20 free entries will be available to poets with a U.S. address, and 20 available to poets with an address outside the U.S. After the first week any remaining free entries will be available to poets both from within and outside the U.S. We strongly recommend that you send an email as soon after the deadlines described below because these free entries may go fast.

 

If you have a U.S. address with a U.S. zip code (including U.S. possession and APO addresses) you can apply starting at 3:00 PM Pacific Time, Saturday May 8, 2021 by sending an email with the subject "Request for Free Entry" and include in the body of the email your name, postal mailing address, email address, and phone number to free.entry@omnidawn.com. To determine what time it is where you live when it is 3PM Pacific time enter the following question in Google, where "local large city" is the largest city in your time zone: "What time is it in local large city when it is 3PM Pacific Time.” For example: If you live in the same time zone as Honolulu, Hawaii, in Google ask: "What time is it in Honolulu when it is 3PM Pacific Time.”

If you have a NON-U.S. address you can apply starting at 6AM Pacific Time, Saturday May 8, 2021 by sending an email with the subject "Request for Free Entry" and include in the body of the email your name, postal mailing address, email address, and phone number to free.entry@omnidawn.com. To determine what time it is where you live when it is 6AM Pacific time enter the following question in Google, where "local large city" is the largest city in your time zone: "What time is it in local large city when it is 6AM Pacific Time.” For example: If you live in the same time zone as Mumbai, India, in Google ask: "What time is it in Mumbai when it is 6AM Pacific Time.”

 

The times to send the emails were chosen to make it as easy as possible for most poets to obtain a free entry. The most difficult time for most poets to send an email is midnight to 6AM. So when it is 6AM Pacific Time the area of the globe where it is midnight to 6AM is in the Pacific Ocean where there is relatively little land mass and hence fewer poets who will be applying from outside the U.S. (We apologize if you happen to live in a Pacific Ocean time zone.) And 3PM Pacific Time is the easiest time for most people in the U.S., and U.S. possessions and military bases to apply.

You can use the free pass at any time before the deadline for the current contest. If the deadline is extended you can submit until the new deadline for the contest. As is true for all manuscripts any identifying info will be stripped from the manuscripts from poets in need so they will be completely blind and in no way be identified as from poets in need. However, if someone asks who were awarded the free entries we will provide a list of all poets who have received a free pass with their city of residence so that we can document that all free passes have been awarded, but there will be no way to connect these names with the manuscripts submitted by poets in need during the contest.

Limitations: Each poet in need can only enter once with a maximum of 4 poems per contest. Be sure to include all 4 poems in one file and in one entry. If you enter fewer than 4 poems in your entry you cannot cannot enter any more poems for free during this contest. These free entries are not transferrable from one person to another or from one contest to another. The name we have on our list of poets awarded passes must match the name of the poet submitting the manuscript in order to get a free entry, and you are not allowed to submit a manuscript for someone else.

 

Two Submission Options

Option 1: Submit on our secure web site. (Most submissions are via our online submission web site. This is usually the easiest way to submit.)

Option 2: Submit via postal mail.

Procedures for each of these options are listed in detail below.

 

Option 1: Procedure to submit on our secure online submission web site.

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

  1. If you have any questions send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or telephone us at (510) 237-5472. Normally, if we can’t take your call immediately, we can usually call you back within 30 minutes.
  2. If you experience a problem submitting online, there is a section at the end of this online submission procedure to help you resolve the problem. Only about one to two percent of our online entrants experience a problem submitting, and these procedures will fix the two common problems of which we are aware.
  3. You will find the link to direct you to the submissions web page at the end of this procedure.
  4. Since you provide contact information on our web site, a page within your manuscript with contact information is OPTIONAL. We prefer that you not include a bio, acknowledgements page, cover letter, or headers or footers that include your name, but you will not be disqualified for including such info, and all such identifying information will be removed from the copy of the manuscript file that is sent to Omnidawn editors who read manuscripts sent to the judge.
  5. You will be able to upload your manuscript on the submissions page. Manuscripts must be sent in one file, not multiple files. Manuscripts must be in PDF, RTF, or Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format only. Files without a .pdf, rtf, .doc, or .docx extension cannot be uploaded. Most word processing programs can save files as .RTF (Rich Text Format) by going to FILE—SAVE AS, and then choosing RTF (Rich Text Format) in the FORMAT drop-down box.
  6. About one percent of entrants to our contests have manuscripts that exceed the online submission managers maximum file size of 10 MB (ten megabytes). If your manuscript does exceed 10MB it will be too large to submit online. Usually only manuscripts with photographs or graphic images become this large, but sometimes PDF files of text only manuscripts become very large for no apparent reason. If your manuscript is over 10MB, you can often reduce the size by reducing the resolution of any photographs or graphic images contained in the file. If you cannot reduce the size of your file below 10MB, we suggest you submit such manuscripts via postal mail. If you attempt to submit a file that is larger than the listed maximum size, all the information in the fields you have completed will usually go blank. If this happens please contact us.
  7. If you HAVE previously entered an Omnidawn contest, either online or via postal mail, you probably already have an account, and you will not be able to create another account using the same Email address. However, you will be able to logon to that account using that Email address. When you go to the secure online submissions page you can log in using the box on the upper left by entering your Email address and your password. If you don’t have your password, click “need help” below the login button, and you can update your password, or you can Email or phone us and we can give you a new password. Once you are logged in you can click “submit your work” in the new box on your left, which will take you to a secure web page to submit a new manuscript and enter credit card information. (Contact information is retained in our database, but credit card numbers are not. For security reasons, all credit card information goes directly to PayPal, our payment processor, and it is not possible for Omnidawn staff to see it or retain it in any way.)
  8. If you HAVE NOT previously entered an Omnidawn contest, when you go to our secure online submission page, you will be asked to enter your credit card billing and contact information, the title of your manuscript, and an 8-20 character password (with no spaces) of your choice. (Contact information is retained in our database, but credit card numbers are not. For security reasons, all credit card information goes directly to PayPal, our payment processor, and it is not possible for Omnidawn staff to see it or retain it in any way.)
  9. If you use a pen name, or if the poet’s name differs from the name on the credit card, or if you are submitting for someone else, please list the pen name or poet’s name in the writer name field, and put your credit card billing name and information in the other fields. 
  10. For this book competition, in the “genre” field you can use the up-down arrow keys to choose one of three options:
    (1) You can choose to pay just the reading fee of $18 to receive NO Omnidawn CHAPBOOKk. (This is the default, so if you do not use the drop-down arrow keys for this field, this is the choice you will make.)
    Or, if you have a U.S mailing address (or can provide a U.S. mailing address in the comments field), you can choose to pay $20 ($2 extra for shipping cost) to receive EITHER:
    (2) This contest's winning CHAPBOOK, (If you choose this option the winning book will be mailed to you when it is published approximately 18 months after you enter.)
    (3) OR Any currently available Omnidawn CHAPBOOK of your choice. If you choose this option, be sure to enter the name of the CHAPBOOK you have chosen in the “comments” field at the bottom of the online submissions page. A complete list of all current Omnidawn poetry CHAPBOOKS is available at www.omnidawn.com/product-category/pocket-series If you choose a book from our catalog, you should receive it within two weeks after your entry has been received. If you forget to specify a book in the “comments” field, we will send you an Email to request your choice of book. You can also send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com to let us know your choice, or if you want to change your selection from the winning book to your choice of booK, or vice versa.
  11. To complete the "file" field click the "Browse" or "Choose File" button to find the manuscript file on your computer. (Some browsers use the word "Browse" and others use the words "Choose File.") Select that file and click the Open or Choose button. The name of your file will then appear in the "file" field.
  12. Fill in your credit card information. Note that credit card info goes directly to our payment processor, PayPal, and is not available to anyone at Omnidawn.
  13. Please DO use the “comments” field at the bottom of the online submissions page to provide any other information you would like us to know such as alternate phone numbers, Email addresses, or mailing addresses, and to provide feedback about your experience submitting to this contest. We are always trying to simplify and improve the submissions process, so your feedback will be very helpful to us. Note that any personal publication history or other information intended for our editors or the judge is irrelevant here because these comments will only be read by staff who are NOT involved in the selection process.
  14. To complete your entry click "submit" and a new screen will appear so you can check to make sure that your information is correct. When you are satisfied that it is correct click "continue" and your entry will be submitted. You must click both "submit" and "continue" to complete your entry.
  15. When your entry is received a new screen will appear that states [submission successfully received] and you should also immediately receive an automatic email confirmation. Within three days a staff member will also open your account, check your contact info, open your manuscript file, and send you a second email which contains the last lines of your manuscript so you know your entry has been completely received, and so you can resolve the problem at no cost to you if it has not. If you do not receive the first automatic Email immediately after you submit, or the second Email containing the last lines of your manuscript within three days of submitting, something may be wrong, and we strongly suggest you contact us by sending an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or by telephoning (510) 237-5472.
  16. If your credit card is not accepted (usually a typo issue) we will email you directions on how to resolve the issue.
  17. If you want to submit additional work, update your contact info or password, or view your submissions you can login at the end of this process or at any time in the future using the Email address and password you entered so that you will not need to complete contact information again. Once you have logged in simply go to the box in the upper left hand corner with the heading "Choose an action" and click one of the options as follows:
    (a) Click "account summary" to view the work you have submitted. You can double click on the numbered file names (for example 12345.doc or 23456.pdf) under the "file" heading to download a copy of a file you have previously submitted. Also note that your original file name has been replaced with a number to help keep your manuscript both unique and anonymous. By the time you download a file all identifying information in the file may have already been stripped from the file, so that our editors can also download these files to read them without compromising the Identity-Hidden nature of these contests.
    (b) Click "update your account" to change your password or any item of your contact information, such as your mailing or email address or your phone number. Be sure to click "update" after you have made any changes.
    (c) Click "submit your work" to submit a new entry. A screen will appear where you can enter the title of your work and credit card information and select the file you want to enter.

       If you experience a problem submitting online

About one to two percent of our online entrants experience a problem with their online submission. Below are the problems of which we are aware and the ways to resolve them. (I you discover a new problem, please let us know so we can post it here, hopefully with a solution.)

  1. If when attempting to log in you receive an error message that states, "We're Sorry, We are experiencing temporary difficulties completing your request at this time. Please try again later," click the blue word "Omnidawn" in the upper left hand corner. The word "Omnidawn" should then turn red momentarily. Then fill in the form with your contact and other information. WARNING: Don't click the word "Omnidawn" after you fill in your information or that information will disappear and you will have to start over.
  2. If when you click "Submit" all the fields you have completed go blank this probably means your manuscript is larger than the 10 megabyte default maximum size. This only happens in about one percent of the submissions. If it happens we suggest you submit your entry via postal mail. The only other option is to reduce the size of your file so it is smaller than 10 megabytes. This can be done by reducing the resolution of graphic files in your manuscript. We only need 100 dpi for reading the manuscripts on screen, so more resolution than this is unnecessary.
  3. If when you click “Continue” you receive a message that your your credit card is NOT accepted (usually because of a typo) your contact information and manuscript still will have been uploaded to our database so that we have everything we need except your payment. You can resolve this issue in one of two ways. (If this happens we will also send you the following instructions in an Email):
    (A) Mail a check for the reading fee to the address at the bottom of this web page. Please write your email address and the title of your manuscript on your check (or money order, which is also acceptable). We will send you an email confirming that your manuscript has been entered into the contest when your check arrives.
    OR
    (B) Enter your credit card info again by going to www.omnidawn.com/submissions1 and using the box on the left to log in using the email address and password you just entered. A screen will appear displaying the contact info you have entered with a record showing the entry you just submitted. In the second field of that record click on the words “pay now” and a secure screen will appear so that you can enter your credit card information again. If successful you will receive an immediate notification of success and an email stating that your submission has been entered into the contest. If your credit card still does not work you can still use option (A) above by mailing a check.

 

         To go to the ONLINE contest submission web page and its concise procedures click here, or paste the following link into your browser:     www.omnidawn.com/submissions1

 

Option 2: Procedure to submit via postal mail

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

If you have any questions send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or telephone (510) 237-5472. Normally, if we can’t take your call immediately, we can usually call you back within 30 minutes.

Please DO NOT send Fed Ex, UPS, or signature required US Post Office envelopes. The post office, UPS, and FedEx often have difficulty obtaining a signature at our offices, and there is a high likelihood such envelopes will be returned to you.

Please enclose the following:

1. One title page with your name, contact information, and if this is your first Omnidawn contest, please also tell us where you learned about our contest (to the best of your recollection). Please include your mailing address, phone number, and Email address if you have one. (Alternate contact info, such as additional phone numbers, Email addresses, or mailing addresses can also be added here if you like.) This title page with contact info can be at the front or, so you don’t have to repaginate, at the back of your manuscript

2. One title page with manuscript title only and nothing else.

3. Your poetry manuscript.

4. For this CHAPBOOK contest, include a check or money order made out to OMNIDAWN PUBLISHING for the reading fee of either $18 or $20. It is very important that the check be made out to "OMNIDAWN PUBLISHING."

Enclose $18 if you choose to receive NO CHAPBOOK

OR,

if you have a U.S mailing address (or can provide a U.S. mailing address), you can enclose $20 ($2 extra for shipping cost) to receive your choice of any currently available Omnidawn CHAPBOOK. If you choose to pay $20 to receive an Omnidawn book, please use the title page that has your contact info to write your choice of book or write “send this contests winning CHAPBOOK.” A complete list of all current Omnidawn CHAPBOOKS is available at www.omnidawn.com/product-category/pocket-series. If you choose a book from our catalog, you should receive it within two weeks after your entry is received at Omnidawn. If you pay the extra $2 and forget to specify your choice of CHAPBOOK we will send you an Email to ask your choice of CHAPBOOK, or you can also send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com to let us know your choice.

5. All manuscripts will be deleted or recycled at the end of the contest. For entries sent by postal mail, please do NOT send an SASE for return of the manuscript.

6. If you provide an Email address with your contact info, within ten days of receiving your entry we will send you an Email to confirm we have received it, so if you mailed your entry via either United States First Class mail or Priority Mail you should receive this verification Email within two weeks of mailing your manuscript. If you have provided us with an Email address and you do not receive this confirmation Email within two weeks, something may be wrong, and we strongly suggest you contact us by sending an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or by telephoning (510) 237-5472. (Note that if you choose to submit online our turnaround time is much faster, and we will send you two Email notifications of receipt, one automatic Email sent immediately after you submit online, and a second Email from a member of our staff within 3 days after you submit, with the last lines of your manuscript so you know your manuscript has been received completely, and so you can fix the problem at no cost to you if it has not.)

7. (Optional) A self-addressed stamped postcard and/or a standard sized SASE. You may, if you choose, include a self-addressed stamped postcard, and we will mail this back to you to verify that your manuscript has been received. You may also enclose a standard size SASE and we will use this to send you information on the winner and finalists when these are determined. If you include an Email address a postcard and/or SASE is usually unnecessary, since you will receive an Email notification of the receipt of your entry and an Email notification of the winners and finalists when they are chosen.

 

Send postal submissions via First Class or Priority Mail to:

Omnidawn Poetry Chapbook Contest
Omnidawn Publishing
1632 Elm Avenue
Richmond, CA 94805-1614

 

Previous Winners

 

       Previous Winners — Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Contest

         The 2021 winner will be announced in October 2021.

Amanda Larson

Winner — 2020 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Jericho Brown

Amanda Larson — Book Title: Gut

Publication Date: October 2021

Amanda Larson is a writer from New Jersey, and an MFA candidate in poetry at New York University. She is a graduate of Scripps College in Claremont, California. Currently, she works as the Assistant Interviews Editor at the Washington Square Review. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

The Finalists of the 2020 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Jericho Brown are (in alphabetical order by last name): Zena Agha, Brooklyn, New York; Mark Faunlagui, Jersey City, New Jersey; Tracy Fuad, University of Raparin Chwarquarna-Ranya Road, Ranya, Iraq; Ben Gaffaney, Austin, Texas; and Jennifer Stella, San Francisco, California.

 

Nathalie Khankan

Winner — 2019 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Dawn Lundy Martin

Nathalie Khankan — Book Title: quiet orient riot

Nathalie Khankan teaches Arabic language and literature in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the Universithy of California, Berkeley. She is the founding director of The Danish House in Palestine. Recent work appears or is forthcoming in the Berkeley Poetry Review and Crab Creek Review. Straddling Finnish, Syrian, Danish and Palestinian homes and heirlooms, she currently lives in San Francisco, California.

The Finalists of the 2019 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Dawn Lundy Martin are (in alphabetical order by last name): Tracy Fuad, Ranya, Iraq; Kevin Holden, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Ethan Plaue, Philadelphia, Pensylvania; Broc Rossell, Singapore; Lisa Wells, Seattle, Washington

 

Logan Fry

Winner — 2018 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Srikanth Reddy

Logan Fry — Book Title: Harpo Before the Opus

Logan Fry lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife, Caroline, where he teaches writing and edits Flag + Void.

The Finalists of the 2018 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Srikanth Reddy are (in alphabetical order by last name): Youna Kwak, Redlands, California; Raine Oet, Syracuse, New York; Vincent Toro, Fort Lee, New Jersey; Jane Wong, Bellingham, Washington; and Candice Wuehle, Lawrence, Kansas;.

 

Jose Moctezuma

Winner — 2017 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Myung Mi Kim

Jose-Luis Moctezuma — Book Title: Place-Discipline

Born in San Gabriel, California, Jose-Luis Moctezuma is a Mexican-American poet, instructor, and academic researcher currently completing a Ph.D. in English at the University of Chicago. His critical and poetic work, which ranges from visual culture to avant-garde poetics, has been published in Jacket2, Big Bridge, FlashPoint, and elsewhere. He co-curates (along with Edgar Garcia) an ethnopoetics blog, Nagualli.blogspot.com, which is dedicated to tracing a "collective psychogeography of the Americas." Spring Tlaloc Seance (Projective Industries, 2016) is his most recent chapbook of poems. He was a managing editor at MAKE Magazine, and an associate editor at Chicago Review. He lives in Chicago.

The Finalists of the 2017 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Myung Mi Kim are (in alphabetical order by last name): Kerry Banazek, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Paul Cunningham Athens, Georgia; Hailey Higdon, Seattle, Washington; Kimberly A. Kruge, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; and Leia Penina Wilson, Las Vegas, Nevada.

 

Henry Wei Leung

Winner — 2016 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Cathy Park Hong

Henry Wei Leung — Book Title: Goddess of Democracy

★★★ Finalist for the 2018 PEN America Award in Poetry ★★★

“The 33-foot-tall Goddess of Democracy was both devised and destroyed during the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. Since then, replicas of the towering idol have appeared around the world. In his remarkable debut…editor and translator Leung addresses these duplicates, homing in on Hong Kong's bronze Goddess—and the censorship and protest, violence and erasure, hope and disillusionment she and her city have witnessed….The ingeniously political and vividly poetic, Leung crafts required reading for anyone who's ever been devoted to the promise of democracy—or the disobedience it so often demands. An explosive, exquisite revolt of a book.” —Briana Shemroske, Booklist, October 15, 2017

“‘Imagine an impossible love, like an impossible grammar,’ demands Leung in his debut, winner of the 2016 Omnidawn 1st/2nd Poetry Book Prize, as he integrates essay, translation, text erasure, and lyric to examine themes of race, privilege, and national identity….What makes this collection magnetic is the measured way that Leung unpacks his own roles—witness, outsider, American, and translator—in the Hong Kong protests.”Publishers Weekly,

Henry Wei Leung is the author of a chapbook, Paradise Hunger (Swan Scythe 2012), and the translator of Wawa's Pei Pei the Monkey King (Tinfish, 2016). He earned his degrees from Stanford and the Helen Zell Writers' Program, and has been the recipient of Kundiman, Soros, and Fulbright Fellowships. His poems, essays, and translations have appeared in such journals as the Crab Orchard Review, The Offing, Spillway, and ZYZZYVA. He has also been the Managing Editor of the Hawai'i Review.

The Finalists of the 2016 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Cathy Park Hong are (in alphabetical order by last name): Lisa Alden, Berkeley, California; Mark Faunlagui, Jersey City, New Jersey; Nicholas Gulig, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin; Douglas Luman, Bethesda, Maryland; and Caroline Young, Athens, Georgia.

 

Jennifer S. Cheng

Winner — 2015 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Claudia Rankine

Jennifer S. Cheng — Book Title: House A

“In her elegiac debut, Cheng, winner of the 2015 Omnidawn 1st/2nd Book Prize, excavates the nostalgic ephemera of the immigrant home. The poems are delicate and dexterous, with Cheng juxtaposing diasporic history with childhood memory. Through eloquent stitching of a childhood dream, she resurrects an estranged home’s haunting air….Anchored by the language of dislocation, each poem stands out as a courageous attempt to find what is imagined as home. Cheng translates the idea of home into a wholly new narrative….The language of diaspora is often drowned out by a popular emphasis on historical language, but Cheng’s poetry is instead an 'architectural palimpsest' of immigrant longing….Cheng utilizes the markers of immigrant language sparingly and demonstrates how that experience is more than history. In this house history is hidden, but shadows every line….Cheng’s poems are a ‘layer of skin’ that she is ‘inclined to peel’—a litany that takes the reader closer to the marrow.”Publishers Weekly, November 7, 2016

“A poetry collection constructed from three disparate yet harmonious parts, House A concerns itself with identity-building, diaspora, and the physical act of building a home and an immigrant family on foreign soil. Yet while these are familiar themes, Cheng defamiliarizes them for the reader through her refractory poems that have the effect of a kaleidoscope, dividing experiences into tiny crystalline slivers and re-assembling them to illustrate the unexpected colors and shapes that lie buried within everyday domestic life. ”The Rumpus, November 25, 2016

“Here in Jennifer S. Cheng's House A, the relationship between the private and the public, the idiolect and the dialect(ic), the relationship between sleep and waking, becomes so glaringly obvious that it cannot be perceived, making the connections as tenuous as intrinsic. So too does a memory and the history constructed around a remembering become a flood, one that shrouds itself and its surroundings. Between the oscillations and waves of the tidal tongue that are the poems of Cheng’s first book House A, (Omnidawn, 2016), we are asked to interrogate with her these fragments of dissolving sound, feeling, and memory, these ‘brief lingering notes’ with ‘such residue’ from our collective and private ‘phantom limb.’ Cheng studies the volatile meteorology between distance and absence, the echo dividing ‘into lights and breaks,’ and all that haunts our and our poet’s ‘landscape of embodied history.’” — Michael E. Woods, Columbia Poetry Review, April 21, 2017

Jennifer S. Cheng writes poetry and essay, often at their intersections. She received her MFA in Nonfiction from the University of Iowa, MFA in Poetry from San Francisco State University, and BA from Brown University. She is the author of an image-text chapbook, Invocation: An Essay (New Michigan Press, 2010), and her writing appears Tin House, Tarpaulin Sky, Web Conjunctions, AGNI, Guernica, Mid-American Review, Black Warrior Review, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. A US Fulbright Scholar and Kundiman Fellow, she is the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Harold Taylor Award, the Ann Fields Poetry Award, and Pushcart Prize nominations from The Volta and The Normal School. Having grown up in Texas, Hong Kong, and Connecticut, she currently lives in San Francisco, where she is a founding editor of Drop Leaf Press. Read more at jenniferscheng.com.

The Finalists of the 2015 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Claudia Rankine are (in alphabetical order by last name): Ashley Chambers New York, New York; Soham Patel, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Joseph Rios, Clovis, California; Jake Syersak, Tucson, Arizona; Jason Whitmarsh, Seattle,Washington.

 

Margaret Ross

Winner — 2014 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Prize — Judge: Timothy Donnelly

Margaret Ross — Book Title: A Timeshare

 

         ★★★ Publishers Weekly Starred Review ★★★

“Full of ideas, almost giddily aloft on the swells of long sentences, and replete with carefully counterintuitive moments of beauty, Ross’s much-awaited debut poses a frequently thrilling…challenge to older generations’ tastes. Ross sees sometimes-dramatic, sometimes-anodyne sites—such as a bland bedroom, the contours of a war memorial, and an Arctic shore—with an eye that fills in pixelated details, ‘retaining little/ nicks the wind chiseled, kelp lashes/ and shade, distant specks of fish/ the size of flies, foam-laced/ concentric halos.’ But she also explores the depths and the crevasses of inner space: 'Is there no method// to flush out the self that wants/ the others gone? Misgivings drowned, all/ attention held there in the room where time// is wide.’ Ross’s sentences, and sometimes her poems, go on for longer than most young poets can manage: her ambitions and digressions may suggest her onetime teacher Jorie Graham, though a deeper influence is Marianne Moore, whose complex sentence patterns, doubling back, and confounding opponents, Ross (now a Stegner Fellow at Stanford) picks up. And Ross uses those modernist patterns to describe the unsettled lives, the unanswered aches, of her own precarious generation (Ross is in her late 20s), outlining with every implication 'some reach/ in the head the sense is// insufficient to relay.”Publishers Weekly, October 19, 2015

Margaret Ross is the author of a chapbook, Decay Constant, from Catenary Press. Her poems have appeared in Adult, Boston Review, Fence, jubilat and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the Fulbright Program and lives in New Haven.

The Finalists of the 2014 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Timothy Donnelly are (in alphabetical order by last name): Daniel Coudriet, Richmond, Virginia; Nik De Dominic, Los Angeles, California; Mike Lala, Brooklyn, New York; Andrew Nance, Athens, Georgia; Caroline Young, Athens, Georgia.

 

Eric Ekstrand

Winner — 2013 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: Donald Revell

Eric Ekstrand — Book Title: Laodicea

 

        ★★★ An Amazon “Hot New Release in Gay and Lesbian Poetry” ★★★

“Ekstrand's debut collection is a slow burn in which poems dance around the idea of apocalypse, both literally and metaphorically….Ekstrand will present a moment or image then shift the lens a fraction to show the side the reader can't quite see….Ekstrand is similar to Frank O'Hara in tone and plainspokenness.”Publishers Weekly, May 4, 2015

Eric Ekstrand was awarded his MFA from University of Houston in May of 2010. He is a former poetry editor at Gulf Coast and his poems have appeared in Bat City, Black Warrior Review, Indiana Review, jubilat, Poetry, and elsewhere. He is a recipient of a 2009 Ruth Lilly Fellowship awarded by the Poetry Foundation. He currently teaches writing at Wake Forest University in North Carolina where he lives with his husband Danny.

The Finalists of the 2013 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Donald Revell are (in alphabetical order by last name): Julia Drescher, Austin, Texas; Daniel Poppick, Iowa City, Iowa; Margaret Ross, New York, New York; Steven Toussaint, Auckland, New Zealand; Caroline Young, Athens, Georgia.

 

Robin Clarke

Winner — 2012 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: Brenda Hillman

Robin Clarke — Book Title: Lines the Quarry

“There have been few new poetry books in recent years that have shaken my heart and thrilled my mind like Robin Clarke’s Lines the Quarry (Omnidawn, 2013). It’s a book I turn to so frequently for inspiration that for months now it’s had a permanent place on my desk.”—Meg Shevenock, Kenyan Review, March 14, 2015

“Robin Clarke, too, is interested in how Western industrial development has ravaged modern landscapes and their inhabitants….Clarke writes with a raw and frenetic command of her facts, suggesting a scraped together life in the unforgiving economic climate of the modern day. The book is particularly powerful when it toggles between the family narrative and the horrors of the American corporate machine….This sort of smoking gun evidentiary move is not particularly common in poetry today, but, with poets such as Clarke infusing outrage with subtlety and compelling semantic slippage, we could use more of it”—Natalaie Shapero, Boston Review, March/April, 2015

Robin Clarke is a poet, activist and teacher in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she has lived most of her life. She is a non-tenure-track faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Conduit, Counterpunch, Fence, In Posse Review, A Joint Called Pauline, LABOR, Lafovea, Sentence, Whiskey and Fox, and word for/word. With the poet Sten Carlson, she has co-authored a chapbook entitled Lives of the Czars.

The Finalists of the 2012 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Brenda Hillman are (in alphabetical order by last name): Jaime Brunton, Lincoln, Nebraska; Meg Day, Salt Lake City, Utah; Endi Bogue Hartigan, Portland, Oregon; Brandon Kreitler, Brooklyn, New York; and Daniel Poppick, Iowa City, Iowa

 

Kathryn Pringle

Winner — 2011 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: C.D. Wright

kathryn l. pringle — Book Title: fault tree

“a wholly original voice. There is nothing quite like it in all of contemporary poetry. fault tree represents a new kind of political poetry. A Catch-22 illogic runs through this poem; in fact it permeates the entire narrative”—Dean Rader, Huffington Post, January 17, 2013

“As the winner of the 2011 Omnidawn First/Second Book Contest, Kathryn L. Pringle follows her 2009 release, Right New Biology (Factory School), with a haunting collection of poems that examines relationship and memory through the interrupted voice of a vulnerable soldier while evaluating science and applying logic and illogic to the passage of time. Pringle begins the collection by introducing theories of Einstein and defining fault tree analysis (FTA), in which Boolean logic is used to analyze engineering, safety, and—€”in Pringle€'s case—the scientific ticking of the clock….By examining the mechanics of time and our lack of manipulation over its passage, Pringle reveals the mental struggle of losing one's self in the moment, in the inability to freeze-frame the here and now….Despite their seemingly esoteric philosophies of science, space, and time, these poems are inviting and accessible for their simple diction, precise imagery, and equal weight of words to space—€”each line'€™s half-breath allows a simple pause before evaporating into the next moment….Because she has arranged most of her poems in a series of quick single lines, Pringle'€™s occasional use of more expected forms catches both the reader'€™s and the speaker'€™s attention….Pringle examines what we all want to know: what is time and where does it go.”—Lori A. May, Colorado Review, Issue 40.1, Spring 2013

“Here comes kathryn l. pringle’s dizzying, suffocating, brilliant fault tree, and here I go again after it into awed uncertainty, a dream-like confusion— “the moment was like falling asleep. Sometimes I think I am asleep. But for the sleep’s duration…”—at once conspiratorial and blaring.”—Christopher Schaeffer, The Volta,

Poet kathryn l. pringle lives in Durham, North Carolina. She received her MFA in Poetry from San Francisco State University. She is the author of one previous book of poetry, RIGHT NEW BIOLOGY (Factory School) and two chapbooks, The Stills (Duration Press) and Temper and Felicity are lovers (TAXT). Her work can also be found in the anthology Conversations at the Wartime Cafe: A Decade of War (Conversations at the Wartime Cafe Press/WODV Press) and in the forthcoming anthology I’ll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing by Women (Les Figues). She is currently writing a novel about place. Her third full-length poetry book, Obsenity for the Advancement of Poetry will be published by Omnidawn in the spring of 2017.

The Finalists of the 2011 First/Second Book Competition chosen by C.D. Wright (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Jill Darling, Mount Clemens, Michigan; Leora Fridman, Florence, Massachusetts; Eryn Green, Denver, Colorado; Jane Gregory, Berkeley, California; and Soham Patel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

 

Kelli Anne Noftle

Winner — 2010 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: Rae Armantrout

Kelli Anne Noftle — Book Title: I Was There for Your Somniloquy

“Noftle’s first book of poems…launches with a slimy sequence about sea slugs....Her surreal, luscious language evokes the sexy ooze and play of underwater invertebrates....Throughout, parasomnia (disruptive sleep behaviors) and somniloquy (sleep talking) are used as metaphors for consciousness and perhaps to shroud disturbing autobiographic details. Attempting to invoke a sleep/wake state known as hypnagogia, the poet simultaneously remembers and forgets the trauma of the primal scene....lovers of contemporary poetry may want to investigate.” —Ellen Kaufman, Library Journal, May 1, 2012

“Like our globe, Kelli Anne Noftle’s book, I Was There for Your Somniloquy, is seventy percent ocean. The poems are submersibles which give us a glimpse of an alien world. It is not the cold, descriptive view of the scientist, but more the view of the visitor to an aquarium who can only see the creatures in the tanks through her own reflection in the glass.” —Frank Montesonti, Jacket2, October 1, 2013

“Many of the individual pieces in I Was There for Your Somniloquy concern themselves with two sets of phenomena: hypnagogia, or the transition state between sleeping and wakefulness, and the behavior and taxonomy of deep sea Nudibranchs, or sea slugs. The book takes its title from the somniloquy, or the act of talking while asleep, an act that converts the private phenomena of the unconscious into a form of exchange. Across three sections of this book—‘Somnus,’ ‘Somnambulist,’ and ‘Hypersomnia’—Noftle’s poems dwell in a space of uncertain wakefulness, and seem interested more in the fissures and omissions of their object of study than in making the map cohere within a single line of vision.” —Julia Bloch, The Volta, March 1, 2014

Kelli Anne Noftle is a graduate of the Master of Professional Writing program at the University of Southern California. Her work has appeared in Colorado Review, The Journal, VERSE, Blackbird, and Harvard Summer Review, among others. Her second full-length poetry book, Adam Cannot Be Adam, will be published by Omnidawn in the fall of 2017. She lives in Los Angeles and is the singer/songwriter for her band, Miniature Soap.

The Finalists of the 2010 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Rae Armantrout (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Jane Gregory, Berkeley, California; Lily Ladewig, Brooklyn, New York; Juliana Leslie, Santa Cruz, California; John Myers, Missoula, Montana; and Rob Schlegel, Iowa City, Iowa.

 

Paul Legault

Winner — 2009 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: Ann Lauterbach

Paul Legault — Book Title: The Madeleine Poems

“It’s hard to think about the Madeleine of Paul Legault’s The Madeleine Poems without thinking about Proust’s madeleine cookie in Swan’s Way. Proust’s madeleine serves as a type of wormhole that propels the narrator through time and space to an otherwise irretrievable memory. Legault’s Madeline, however, is more of a vortex, a presence that presides over the collection, which simultaneously gathers and vaporizes the poem’s subject matter, leaving essences, memories, shadows....One finds that many of the poems and or their constituent parts serve as markers or beacons afloat on a tumultuous sea of time....Though the cookie’s presence is wormhole-like (it collapses the time and space between two disparate points into a singularity) and Legault’s Madeleine vortex, panoptic in the manner it enables one to view a cross-section of a continuous present (albeit in a manner which reorganizes and or obliterates the experience from which the poem came), the two share a similar resultant effect: to recreate a 'vast structure of recollection'....While the comparison between Proust and Legault may be, at best, an intellectual exercise, it sheds light on the overall aim of The Madeleine Poems: to recreate an architecture in which mercurial experience can be reconstituted and preserved and in some cases amplified, an aim that is full of pathos, heroism, and beauty.” —Ben Mirov, Jacket2, October 20, 2011

“Such a book is less written than it is composed, creating centers for the music of Legault’s lines, which turn the mundane into a new phonics of meaning. The poems stutter to their rhymes and echo their own language constantly. They justify a new landscape: that is, both adjust and prove. There is a fresh quality to every word anchored on the line, and these moorings cast nets of meaning throughout the poems, stretching around the book like a skin that fits airtight and appears beautifully strange.” —Jordan Reynolds, The Offending Adam, June 15, 2011

Paul Legault was born in Ontario and raised in Tennessee. When he won the Omnidawn First/Second Book Prize in 2011 for The Madeleine Poems he worked at the Academy of American Poets. Since then he has won the 2011 Fence Modern Poets Series for his book the other poems. In 2012 his book, The Emily Dickinson Reader, a terse English-to-English translation of her poetry, was published by McSweeney’s. He is also a co-founder of the translation press Telephone Books. He received a BFA in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Virginia. He is currently the writer-in-residence at Washington University in St. Louis.

The Finalists of the 2009 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Ann Lauterbach (in alphabetical order by last name) are: James Belflower, Albany, New York; Nik DeDominic, New Orleans, Louisiana; Dot Devota, who lived abroad this summer in Beirut, Lebanon; Jean-Paul Pequeur, New York; and Zach Savich, Northampton, Massachusetts.

 

Michelle Taransky

Winner — 2008 Omnidawn First/Second Poetry Book Prize — Judge: Marjorie Welish

Michelle Taransky — Book Title: Barn Burned, Then

“Taransky reinvigorates the tradition of the avant-garde with this fragmentary and ingenious celebration of immanence, immediacy, and materiality over transcendence, literality, and sentimental reductivism. Barn Burned, Then isn't, by any means, an easy read; nevertheless, one can't fully understand the metaphysical contours of human speech and emotion without reading a superlative work like this one, so gird yourself for the challenge and dive courageously into the fire.” —Seth Abramson, The Huffington Post, April 1, 2012

“Taking up her cudgel and adz against conventional uses of language in poetry, she achieves a perfect splintering that generates multi-factorial images and levels of meaning and the kind of com- pound-eye truth that can be achieved only through the concentrated focus of a thousand perspective…In Barn Burned, Then, images like these are repeated and expanded in later poems into multiple permutations, with the extreme heterogeneity of materials and consequent foregrounding of language being precisely the point. Words like “mother,” “safe,” “weeds,” “frame,” “tender,” “teller,” “fold,” “bank,” “branch,” “burn,” “barn,” and “burglars” repeat in the book like talismans. Subsequent readings morph a “teller” from a person behind a bank window into one who witnesses or “tells” (or “untells”) truths and a “safe” from a noun meaning a bank vault to an ironic adjective in a world where the vagaries of a capitalist economy level bulldoze entire cultures along with their historical structures....But Barn Burned, Then is more than an elegy to the Midwestern farm- ing way of life or even an objectivist treatise on the fallibility of language. It is in the most fundamental sense also an eclogue, poetry that focuses on what is constituent and continuous in nature, on what existed before and will continue to exist after all the barns have been raised and razed....And sometimes, as Taransky shows in this remarkable and sometimes infuriating first book, it becomes possible to fathom a universe from an unflinching examination of its constellations and of each constituent star.” —Rebecca Foust, American Book Review, September—October, 2010

When Michelle Taransky won the 2010 Omnidawn First/Second Book Prize in 2010 for Barn Burned, Then she was the Assistant Director at Kelly Writer’s House and taught at Temple University. She now teaches critical and creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania and continues to teach poetry workshops at Temple University. In 2013 Omnidawn published her second full-length book of poetry, Sorry Was In The Woods. She received a BA from the University of Chicago and an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. With her father, architect Richard Taransky, she is the coauthor of the chapbook The Plans Caution (QUEUE 2007). Her poems have appeared in Denver Quarterly, VOLT, How2, New American Writing, and other publications. She lives in Philadelphia.

The Finalists of the 2008 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Marjorie Welish (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Ethan Saul Bull, Portland, Oregon; Michael Todd Edgerton, Athens, Georgia; Carol Hembree, New Orleans, Louisiana; Brandon Shimoda, Seattle, Washington; and Jordan Windholz, Bronx, New York.

     (First book contests and first/second book contests are easier for new poets because competition from poets with more published books is not allowed.)

 

       Previous Winners — Omnidawn Open (Poetry Book Contest)

          The 2021 winner will be announced in February 2022.

Brandan Griffin

Winner — 2020 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Brian Teare

Brandan Griffin — Book Title: Impastoral

Available for Purchase and Review: April 2022

Brandan Griffin was born in Massachusetts and now lives in Sunnyside, New York. He studied English at Harvard University and has an MFA from Columbia. Some of his poems are forthcoming in Tagvverk. This is his first published book.

The Finalists of the 2019 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Brian Teare are (in alphabetical order by last name): Sam Creely, Pasadena, California; Mark Faunlagui, Jersey City, New Jersey; Patricio Ferrari, New York City, New York; Emma Train, Austin, Texas; and Lindsey Webb, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

Katie Peterson

Winner — 2019 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Rachel Zucker

Katie Peterson — Book Title: Life in a Field

Katie Peterson is the author of four collections of poetry: This One Tree (2006), Permission (2013), The Accounts (2013) winner of the Rilke Prize from the University of North Texas, and A Piece of Good News (2019), named one of the Ten Best Poetry Books of the Year by The New York Times Book Review. Her edition of the New Selected Poems of Robert Lowell was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2017. She has been awarded grants by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and the Radcliffe Intitute for Advanced Study. Currently Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Davis, she also holds the title of Chancellor’s Fellow. At Davis, she directs the Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing. She has taught at Bennington College, Deep Springs College, and Tufts University. She holds a doctorate in English from Harvard University, where she wrote a thesis on Emily Dickinson. Peterson lives in Berkeley, California with her husband, the photographer Young Suh, and their daughter Emily Louise. With Suh, she collaborates in video, artist’s books, and mixed media — Mills College Art Museum commissioned a show of their collaborations, Can We Live Here? Stories from a Difficult World, in 2016.

The Finalists of the 2019 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Rachel Zucker are (in alphabetical order by last name): Nora Claire Miller, Iowa City, Iowa; Jennifer Stella, San Francisco, California; Michael Joseph Walsh, Denver, Colorado; Lindsey Webb, Salt Lake City, Utah; Leah Xue, Ypsilanti, Michigan.

 

Anthony Cody

Winner — 2018 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Mei-mei Berssenbrugge

            Anthony Cody — Book Title: Borderland Apocrypha

         ★★★ Finalist for the 2020 National Book Award ★★★

     ★★★ Finalist for the 2021 PEN America Jean Stein Award ★★★

   ★★★ Finalist for the 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Award ★★★

         ★★★ Winner of the 2020 Southwest Book Award ★★★

                                    ★★★ One of Ten of the Year's Best Debut Poets — Poets & Writers Magazine ★★★

“Focused on immigration, detention, and survival around the U.S.-Mexico border, Cody’s fierce, righteously outraged collection deserves shelf space near other recent monuments of highly political, partly conceptual poetry: M. NourBese Philips’s Zong!, for example, or Layli Long Soldier’s Whereas. Lines of diagrammed sentences, free verse, vertical and off kilter overlapping or inverted words, and the border cross, repeat, and point ahead….Lynchings in nineteenth-century California introduce gruesome modern “TripAdvisor Reviews” for a hanging tree; other pages rearrange what appear to be government documents about funding present-day detention camps. Inset photographs complement the mix of English and Spanish, family history and public lexicon, double meanings and historical warnings….Cody also creates a long bilingual erasure of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo….If some readers find it grim or overwhelming, more may find in the course of Borderland Apocrypha’s built-up prepositions and propositions, “How it is to feel yourself less // how nothing goes numb.”—Stephanie Burt, American Poets Magazine, Spring-Summer, 2020

“Anthony Cody’s avant-garde collection Borderland Apocrypha, a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry, collages text and visual imagery with free verse, concrete poems, erasure poems, overlapping text, and newspaper clippings. A beautifully designed book, the text is printed in landscape orientation, pushing against the boundaries of the page. As with these other collections, Cody tells of personal history and family trauma. Setting poems amid the historical context of the lynching of Mexicans in the United States throughout the nineteenth century, he offers readers insight into a moment that has often been excluded from American history. He uses images to capture these moments in more than just words, creating an interactive space for deep engagement by deconstructing sentences and historical information….Borderland Apocrypha embeds poems in reproductions of obfuscated documents to reify the historical erasure of violence against Mexican Americans. Cody makes his reader face what has been forgotten and swept under the rug, pushing our understanding of history—and also, importantly, our understanding of how books might evolve—to reflect our modern, multimodal forms of communication.”—Ruben Quesada, Harvard Review, December 11, 2020

 

Anthony Cody is a CantoMundo fellow from Fresno, California. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Gulf Coast, Ninth Letter, Prairie Schooner, TriQuarterly, The Boiler, among other journals. Anthony is a member of the Hmong American Writers’ Circle where he co-edited How Do I Begin?: A Hmong American Literary Anthology. As an MFA candidate at Fresno State, he serves as a fellow in the Laureate Lab Visual Wordist Studio started by Juan Felipe Herrera. In 2018, he received the Galway Kinnell Scholarship to attend the Community of Writers of Squaw Valley. He is the communications manager for CantoMundo, as well as an associate poetry editor for Noemi Press.

The Finalists of the 2018 First/Second Book Competition chosen by Srikanth Reddy are (in alphabetical order by last name): Tracy Fuad, Ranya, Iraq; Kevin Holden, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Ethan Plaue, Philadelphia, Pensylvania; Broc Rossell, Singapore; Lisa Wells, Seattle, Washington

 

T.J. Andderson III

               Winner — 2017 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Arthur Sze

     T.J. Anderson III — Book Title: Devonte Travels the Sorry Route

                                                        ★★★ One of Library Journal's★★★

★★★ "Fifteen Key Poetry Collections from Presses Large and Small | Spring Poetry 2019" ★★★

“Wandering through time—and through fractured lines spilling down the page in tightly packed, gem-brilliant language—protean, wide-open Devonte travels the “sorry route” of the eponymous Brian Counihan painting on the book’s cover, showing a tricorn-hatted soldier and an African man in chains.…The result is a visceral encapsulation of the black experience throughout history—and how that experience reverberates through all history—and an extraordinary character to meet. VERDICT Winner of Omnidawn’s Open Book Poetry Prize, this book will take a moment for the uninitiated, but Anderson really does have a flame in his hand. A strong addition to poetry collections.”—Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal, May 7, 2019

T.J. Anderson III has degrees from University of Massachusetts at Boston, University of Michigan, and SUNY Binghamton. He is a former Fulbright Scholar at Cairo University and the author of Notes to Make the Sound Come Right: Four Innovators of Jazz Poetry (University of Arkansas Press), River to Cross (Backwaters Press), Cairo Workbook (Willow Books), the Spoken-Word CD, Blood Octave (Flat Five Recordings), and the chapbook At Last Round Up (lift books). He lives with his family in Roanoke, Virginia and teaches at Hollins University.

The five finalists selected by Arthur Sze (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Chad Bennett, Austin, Texas; Samuel Merriman Gilpin, Portland, Oregon; Alyx Raz, Medina, Ohio; Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman, Bellingham, Washington; and M.A. Vizsolyi, Morrisville, Pennsylvania.

 

Diana Khoi Nguyen

     Winner — 2016 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Terrance Hayes

                   Diana Khoi Nguyen — Book Title: Ghost Of

    ★★★★★ Winner 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award ★★★★★

         ★★★ Finalist for the 2018 National Book Award ★★★

   ★★★ Finalist for the 2018 Los Angeles Times Book Award ★★★

 

                     ★★★ Publishers Weekly Starred Review ★★★

“In her innovative debut, Nguyen documents an immigrant family grappling with a son and brother lost to suicide….Poems alternate between lyric fragments that are scattered across the page, akin to “ashes into the sea,” and altered family photographs that operate as testimony and generative force. In “Triptych,” a blurry family portrait displays a small figure cut out of the front row; the dead one’s thoughts (“mind/ ful of/ the setti/ ing he co/ unted off/ the seconds/ in his head”) subsequently fill the cut-out shape of the preceding page; and the final section inserts the speaker’s detached, obsessive, looping voice in the space of the original photograph while still preserving the original cut-out’s white space. Poems that follow map the violent impact of the brother’s ghostly presence in the speaker’s life….Though devastating, Nguyen’s impressive lyrico-visual rendering details survival despite overwhelming tragedy.”—Publishers Weekly, June 4, 2018

“Two years before taking his own life, Nguyen’s brother severed himself from a series of family photographs. In this commanding first collection, winner of the Omnidawn Open, Nguyen presents black-and-white reproductions of these images, forging silhouette- and shard-shaped poems—as well as gaping fissures—from every incision. Haunting, incisive, and exceptionally spare, Nguyen’s shape-shifting poems confront death, displacement, and the emptiness within and around us….Nguyen also employs incantatory repetition to chilling effect. In the stunning final verse of the concluding poem, Nguyen vows: “I . . . will fill in for you, fill you in until the end; I will never give you up I will never give up I will never.” A soaring tribute, a mesmerizing visual feat, and an all-around astonishing debut.”—Briana Shemroske, Booklist, March 15, 2018

Born in Los Angeles, Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet and multimedia artist whose work has appeared widely in literary journals such as Poetry, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, PEN America, and The Iowa Review, among others. A winner of the 92Y's Discovery / Boston Review 2017 Poetry Contest, she currently lives in Colorado where she is pursuing a PhD in creative writing at the University of Denver.

The five finalists selected by Terrance Hayes (in alphabetical order by last name) are: T. J. Anderson III, Roanoke, Virginia; Carol Ann Davis, Sandy Hook, Connecticut; Nicholas Gulig, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin; Angelo Mao, Sommerville, Massachusetts; and M. A. Vizolyi, Goleta, California.

 

Andrew Seguin

Winner — 2015 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Calvin Bedient

Andrew Seguin — Book Title: The Room in Which I Work

Andrew Seguin is a poet and photographer who was born in Pittsburgh in 1981. He is the author of two chapbooks, Black Anecdote and NN, and his poems have appeared widely in literary journals, including A Public Space, Boston Review, Gulf Coast and Iowa Review. His work often explores the intersection of language and image, and has been supported by the Fulbright Program, the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, and Poets House. Andrew lives in New York City.

The five finalists selected by Calvin Bedient (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Mark Faunlagui, Jersey City, New Jersey; Jackqueline Frost, Ithaca, New York; Sarah Heady, San Francisco, California; Allyson Paty, Brooklyn, New York; and Jake Sysersak, Athens, Georgia.

 

Meredith Stricker

Winner — 2014 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Mary Jo Bang

Meredith Stricker — Book Title: Our Animal

A visual artist and poet working in cross-genre media, Meredith Stricker is the author of Tenderness Shore (National Poetry Series/LSU Press); Alphabet Theater, (performance poetry from Wesleyan University Press) and Mistake (Caketrain Press). She is co-director of visual poetry collaborative, a studio that focuses on architecture in Big Sur and projects to bring together artists, writers, musicians and experimental forms.

The five finalists selected by Mary Jo Bang (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Curtis L. Crisler, Fort Wayne, Indiana; Kit Frick, Brooklyn, New York; Leora Fridman, Berkeley, California; Solomon Rino, Berkeley, California, and Caroline Young, Athens, Georgia.

 

C. Violet Eaton

Winner — 2013 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Forrest Gander

C. Violet Eaton — Book Title: Some Habits

C. Violet Eaton is the editor of Bestoned (a handmade journal of poetry) and RuralHarmonics (a ‘zine), as well as the author of a chapbook, No Outside Force Can Harm the Coyote (Free Poetry, 2014). His work has appeared in Aufgabe, BafterC, Cannibal, Colorado Review, Fence, and the Yalobusha Review, among others. He lives in Arkansas with his wife, the poet Sara Nicholson, on the eastern bluff of the White River. He sells used and rare books.

         ★★★ One of Library Journal's "Top Spring Indie Poetry" Books from Barbara Hoffert ★★★

“Winner of the Omnidawn Open, ­Eaton’s first full-length book presents a series of prose poems cum letters offering physically and emotionally rich meditations from a speaker seeking to connect: ‘I can call us complicit, or I can sit here on the porch and worry on us, hard. Neither thing is there. The hum is there.’ And what a hum. Shunning descriptive excess for the concrete (‘Nimbus borne up, loud like a filament. A jay. Wasp’), this work reads like a Joseph Cornell box come alive.”—Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal, April 15, 2015

The five finalists selected by Forrest Gander (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Julia Bloch, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Jean Donnelly, Exeter, New Hampshire; Jill Magi, New York City, New York; Daniel Poppick, Iowa City, Iowa; and Simone White, Brooklyn, New York.

Endi Hartigan

Winner — 2012 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Cole Swensen

Endi Hartigan — Book Title: Pool  [5 choruses]

“As Hartigan's muscular poems wrestle with interchangeability, so too do their innovative structures challenge its boundaries. Acrobatic and playful, the poems turn back and reflect on themselves, daring readers to consider intention and arbitrariness at once. And yet, the book is wary of the total annihilation of individual meaning: "The slippage that we must avoid is a certain blanketing in which/ the delicacy of perception is lost." Hartigan's poems take simultaneity and expose it: "The news is on, the news is on at the same time as the game, sorry, it's on at the same time, I'm sorry." Individual moments are individual for having been chosen—lifted out of the noise—and Hartigan's poems make the claim that the act of choosing, no matter how choral the result, is of the greatest importance.”—Publishers Weekly, May 19, 2014

Endi Bogue Hartigan's first book, One Sun Storm (Center for Literary Publishing, 2008) was selected for the Colorado Prize for Poetry and was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. She published the chapbook out of the flowering ribs in 2012 in collaboration with artist Linda Hutchins, and has recently created work as part of an artist-writer collective, as well as helping curate the Spare Room poetry series. Her poems haves appeared in Verse, Chicago Review, Pleiades, VOLT, Free Verse, Peep/Show, Yew, Jack London is Dead, The Oregonian, and other publications. Endi works for the state university system, and lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband Patrick and their son Jackson.

The five finalists selected by Cole Swensen (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Emily Abendroth, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Jenny Drai, Oxnard, California; Craig Dworkin, Salt Lake City, Utah; Brandon Lussier, Hartford, Connecticut; and Stephanie Ellis Schlaifer, Saint Louis, Missouri.

Sarah Gridley

Winner — 2011 Omnidawn Open — Judge: Carl Phillips

Sarah Gridley — Book Title: Loom

“Gridley’s evocative, romantic, three-part collection weaves its own myths and phrases loosely around Tennyson’s poem ‘The Lady of Shalott.’…For Gridley the lady is a poet, a muse, a spirit of history, a symbol of mind itself.…Gridley places short units of spell-like verse, featuring forests and mirrors, tidal spaces…and white space where ‘the imaginary world seems promised here.’”—Publishers Weekly, January 21, 2013

“Gridley's third book of poems (after Green Is the Orator) brims with intelligent, moving poems. The title is apt, as the author weaves delightful facts and observations into a counterpane of beautiful language and ideas.…Throughout, Gridley pays close attention to the natural world and has a unique way of recording it. VERDICT: Turning on unexpected facts so that they frequently surprise and delight the reader, the poems here are full of intelligence and wonder that connect the reader to the natural world.”—Doris Lynch, Library Journal, February 15, 2013

“Gridley’s is a fully breathing poetry that is intimately involved with its allusion. It is quiet and voluminous. It is settled and concise. If you were to consider the Arthurian folktale-ish element of “The Lady of Shallot,” Loom immerses itself in the mystery of the folk. It almost feels lost in this immersion. But because of the tragic figure of Tennyson’s poem, Loom remains poignant and immediate.”—Kent Shaw, The Rumpus, November 1, 2013

“Loom has a magnificent sense of rhythm, one that resonates throughout. Using the Tennyson poem as a stepping-off point, the poems seek out weave and unfurl, carefully working to explore the smallest moments around and between such a well-known Victorian ballad. Despite the occasional urgency, there is a meditative stillness that emerges through Gridley’s lines, quietly demanding an increased attention. Even more than usual, the reader is forced to listen.”—Rob McLennan, Jacket2, March 4, 2014

Sarah Gridley is the author of two previous books of poetry: Weather Eye Open (2005) and Green is the Orator (2010), both from the University of California Press. She is an assistant professor of English at Case Western Reserve University.

The five finalists selected by Carl Phillips (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Anne Cecelia Holmes, Northampton, Massachusetts; Jill Darling, Mt. Clemens, Michigan; Matt Reeck, Brooklyn, New York; Nik De Dominic, New Orleans, Louisiana; Trey Moody, Lincoln, Nebraska.

 

       Previous Winners — Omnidawn Poetry Chapbook Contest

          The 2021 winner will be announced in December 2021.

Mary G. Wilson

Winner — Omnidawn 2020 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Victoria Chang

Mary G. Wilson — Chapbook Title: Both, Apollo

Mary G. Wilson earned an MFA from Brown University and is currently completing a PhD in English at the University of California, Berkeley. She co-curated the Holloway Series in Poetry from 2016-2018, and she is the author of the chapbook Not Yet (Projective Industries, 2019). Her poetry has appeared in Coconut, Anomalous, Typo, Paperbag, the Scores, Elderly, and elsewhere.

The finalists (in alphabetical order by last name) are selected by Victoria Chang are: Sebastian Bernard, Istanbul, Turkey; Trace DePass, Jamaica, New York; Wren Hanks, Brooklyn, New York; Keith Jones, Boston, Massachusetts; and Emily Luan, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Brody Parrish Craig

Winner — Omnidawn 2019 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Tongo Eisen-Martin

Brody Parrish Craig — Chapbook Title: Boyish

Originally from Louisiana, Brody Parrish Craig is a poet and tranarchist who currently lives in the Ozarks. They are an educator and creator of TWANG, a regional creative project for TGNC folks in the South and Midwest US. Craig's poetry has appeared in TYPO, EOAGH, Gigantic Sequins and Crab Fat Magazine, amongst others. They can often be found by the creek.

The finalists (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Mark Anthony Cayanan, Angeles City, Philippines; Stephanie Heit, Ypsilanti, Michigan; Gary Jackson, Charleston, South Carolina; Peter Myers, Takoma Park, Maryland; and Jianna Jihyun Park, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Brittany Tomaselli

Winner — Omnidawn 2018 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Carl Phillips

Brittany Tomaselli — Chapbook Title: Since Sunday

Brittany Tomaselli received her MFA in Poetry from Columbia College Chicago. Her work can be found in Fairy Tale Review, The Wanderer, and Columbia Poetry Review. She currently lives and works in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

The finalists (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Kristin George Bagdanov, Sacramento, California; Scott Challener, Ashland, Massachusetts; Nicholas Chng, Singapore; Asa Drake, Ocala, Florida; and Sara Saab, London, United Kingdom.

 

Steve Dickison

Winner — Omnidawn 2017 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Tyrone Williams

Steve Dickison — Chapbook Title: Inside Song

Steve Dickison recently guest-edited, with David Meltzer, the “Shuffle Boil Special Issue” of Amerarcana; “For Mnemosyne” appeared at SFMOMA’s Open Space: The View from Here, Issue 4; [ 2nd floor projects ] published Sound Studio 3 (Liner Notes) for the exhibition “time silence and the sky: Norma Cole, Léonie Guyer, Wayne Smith”; a portion of “Liberation Music Orchestra” was in BAX 2015: Best American Experimental Poetry (Wesleyan, 2016); and four poems from “Wear You to the Ball” received the 2014 BOMB Poetry Prize. He directs The Poetry Center at San Francisco State University, teaches at that school and at California College of the Arts, and lives in San Francisco.

The Finalists of the 2017 Poetry Chapbook Competition chosen by Tyrone Williams (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Sam Corfman, Chicago, Illinois; Kamden Hilliard, Kaaawa, Hawaii; Emily Martin, Chicago, Illinois; Alex Raz, Medina, Ohio; and Jonathan William Stout, Iowa City, Iowa.

 

Laura Neuman

Winner — Omnidawn 2016 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Hoa Nguyen

Laura Neuman — Chapbook Title: Risk:: Nonchalance

Laura Neuman is the author of Stop the Ocean (Stockport Flats 2014), and The Busy Life (Gazing Grain 2012). Her/their poems have appeared in Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics (Chax Press and Nightboat Books), and in the journals The Brooklyn Rail, EOAGH, small portions, Tinge, X Poetics, Fact-simile, La Norda Specialo, and The Encyclopedia Project. They live in Philadelphia and teach creative and critical writing and literature, variously, at Temple University, Community College of Philadelphia, and The College of New Jersey. The recipient of an award from The Fund for Poetry, they hold an M.F.A. from Bard College Milton Avery School of the Arts, and an M.A. in poetry from Temple University.

The Finalists of the 2016 Poetry Chapbook Competition chosen by Hoa Nguyen (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Mary Molinary, Tucson, Arizona; Lindsay Choi, Chino Hills, California; Patrick Kindig, Bloomington, Indiana; Tessa Micaela Landreau-Grasmuck, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Ethan Plaue, Austin, Texas.

 

John Liles

Winner — Omnidawn 2015 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Brian Teare

John Liles — Chapbook Title: Following the dog down

John Liles is a living mammal, science writer, and poet at work within the interdiscipline. His writing has appeared in inter/rupture, Decomp, Arcadia, and The Gulf Coast Review, and has been selected for the Ina Coolbrith Memorial Prize. His work on nematodes has been included as teaching material in the science writing courses at UCSD. On a good day, he's a dog and don't need to overthink it.

The Finalists of the 2014 Poetry Chapbook Competition chosen by Brian Teare (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Adam Atkinson, Interlochen, Michigan; Matthew Cooperman, Fort Collins, Colorado; Sam Corfman, Chicago, Illinois; Madison Davis, Alameda, California; and Jenny Drai, Bonn, Germany.

 

Dan Rosenberg

Winner — Omnidawn 2014 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Kazim Ali

Dan Rosenberg — Chapbook Title: Thigh's Hollow

Dan Rosenberg is the author of two books, cadabra (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2015) and The Crushing Organ (Dream Horse Press, 2012), and the co-translator of Miklavž Komelj's Hippodrome (Zephyr Press, 2015). He hold an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a PhD from the University of Georgia. A co-editor of Transom, he teaches at Wells College in Aurora, New York.

The Finalists of the 2014 Poetry Chapbook Competition chosen by Kazim Ali (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Erin J. Mullikin, Syracuse, New York; Sho Sugita, Yokote, Japan; Grant Souders, Golden, Colorado; Jasmine Dreame Wagner, Brooklyn, New York; and Ken White, San Diego, California.

 

Sara Deniz Akant

Winner — Omnidawn 2013 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Gillian Conoley

Sara Deniz Akant — Chapbook Title: Parades

“I received Sara Deniz Akant’s Parades (2014) at the perfect time—just days before Halloween. I’m not sure if this was the solid marketing of Omnidawn Publishing, or mere coincidence, but this chapbook will haunt you, not only with images of ghosts speckled from the first page throughout the book but also with remnants of dead white men whose metered verse feels fragmented, torn, and echoing….Essentially, Sara Deniz Akant is reworking what we know of the prose poem in many of these pieces, but much more fragmented, and a lot more caesuraed. Comprehensively, the collection moves from what feels like an establishment of setting, piecing itself together through a collection of character-driven poems marking the dead from abandoned spaces, and turning on itself in dystopian machinery.”—John Bonanni, Cape Cod Poetry Review, October 26,2014

Sara Deniz Akant received a BA in English from Wesleyan University and an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where she was the recipient of a Truman Capote fellowship, a Teaching-Writing fellowship, and named the Provosts' Postgraduate Visiting Writer to the English department. Her work has appeared in Lana Turner, Wag's Revue, Super Arrow, petri press, and The Claudius App, among other journals. Recipient of the John Logan Prize for Poetry and awards from the Academy of American Poets, the James Merrill House, and Yaddo, she grew up in New York City.

The Finalists of the 2013 Poetry Chapbook Competition chosen by Gillian Conoley (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Elizabeth Cross, Falls Church, Virginia; Sarah Heady, San Francisco, California; Pattie McCarthy, Ardmore, Pennsylvania; Mary Molinary, Tucson, Arizona; and Benjamin Sutton, Dublin, Ohio.

Angela Hume

Winner — Omnidawn 2012 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Joseph Lease

Angela Hume — Chapbook Title: The Middle

“If, decades after our extinction, shreds of the documents that recorded what would eventually cause all our deaths survived, these texts might look like the fragments of Angela Hume’s The Middle. In this way, the book becomes both prophetic and deeply enmeshed in the present, as perhaps all true prophecies must be”—Elizabeth Kate Switaj, Poet's Quarterly

“Does it all come back, dear (r), to the poetic line as an imaginary object penetrating nothing, drawing on everything, drawing a possible world on the page? Hume’s fractured, fragmented, and fractal poetics always strike me as a meditation on what can’t be said, a mapping out of absence.”—Oona-Verse

Angela Hume lives in Oakland. She is the author of the chapbook Second Story of Your Body (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs, 2011). Her poems appear in such journals as Mrs. Maybe, Little Red Leaves, RealPoetik, eccolinguistics, Zoland Poetry, and Spinning Jenny. Her first full-length poetry book is being published by Omnidawn in spring 2016.

The Finalists of the 2012 Chapbook Competition chosen by Joseph Lease (in alphabetical order by last name) are: John Cross, Pasadena, California; C. Violet Eaton, Fayetteville, Arkansas; HL Hazuka, San Francisco, California; Sara Peck, Charleston, South Carolina, and Matthias Regan, Chicago, Illinois.

Evan Harrison

Winner — Omnidawn 2011 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Ben Lerner

Evan Harrison — Chapbook Title: Sham City

“Sham City is a metropolis of backwards, upside-down and inside-out architecture and society. M. C. Escher would be perfectly at home living there. Funny and fierce, there is nothing false in Harrison's vision.”—Sam Martone, Hayden's Ferry Review

Evan Harrison lives in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. In 2011, he received an MA in creative writing from The Center for Writers at The University of Southern Mississippi. His poems have appeared in alice blue, Bat City Review, CutBank, DIAGRAM, Hayden's Ferry Review and otoliths.

The Finalists of the 2011 Chapbook Competition chosen by Ben Lerner (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Brian Foley, Northampton, Massachusetts; Hugo Garcia Manriquez, Oakland, California; Nicholas Gulig, Eau Claire, Wisconsin; Megan Pruiett, San Francisco, California; and M. A. Vizsolyi, Brooklyn, New York.

Zack Savich

Winner — Omnidawn 2010 Poetry Chapbook Prize — Judge: Elizabeth Robinson

Zack Savich — Chapbook Title: The Man Who Lost His Head

“This 26-page poem bristles with desire, desire to know the world, but not to allow such knowledge to obscure the experience of being in the world. Savich writes, ‘Hold on to my arm. / You can't metabolize desire, thus, we confuse / it with grace. The scar arrives.’ There is a tender probing to the voice in this poem, a quiet, contemplative stance that records in compressed yet expansive language the happenings of the day as a backdrop for metaphysical inquiry”—Noah Eli Gordon, Rain Taxi Review of Books

Zach Savich is the author of Full Catastrophe Living, winner of the 2008 Iowa Poetry Prize, Annulments, winner of the 2010 Colorado Prize for Poetry, and The Firestorm, from the Cleveland State University Poetry Center. His full-length poetry book The Orchard Green and Every Color was published by Omnidawn in 2016.

The Finalists of the 2010 Chapbook Competition chosen by Elizabeth Robinson (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Jackie Clark, Jersey City, New Jersey; Robin Powlesland, Taos, New Mexico; Kate Schapira, Providence, Rhode Island; Shannon Tharp, Seattle, Washington; Erin Wilson, Berkeley, California

 

       Winner — Omnidawn Lake Merritt Contest

Desirée Alvarez

Winner — Omnidawn 2018 Lake Merritt Revealed Identity Prize — Judge: Hoa Nguyen

Desirée Alvarez — Title: Raft of Flame

“The powerful second collection from Alvarez (Devil’s Paintbrush) explores the remnants of Central American cultures after the 16th-century Spanish conquest, examining what endures and what doesn’t after plunder, colonization, and the destruction of a civilization…Alvarez's images are startlingly potent…and her language has a distinct artistry…Alvarez brings the reader to an ancient world that is, in fact, still alive." Publishers Weekly, January 17, 2020

Desirée Alvarez is a painter whose first book, Devil’s Paintbrush, won the 2015 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Award. Her poetry was recently anthologized in What Nature (MIT Press, 2018) and is featured in Other Musics: New Latina Poetry (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019). She has published poems in Boston Review, Fence, Poetry, and The Iowa Review. She received the Glenna Luschei Poetry Award from Prairie Schooner, and fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts, Yaddo, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and Poets House. As a visual artist she was awarded the Willard L. Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Alvarez is a graduate of Wesleyan University and the School of Visual Arts. She exhibits widely, teaches at CUNY and The Juilliard School, and is an artist-in-residence at Brooklyn Botanic Garden

The finalists chosen by Hoa Nguyen (in alphabetical order by last name) are: Gabe Kruis, Brooklyn, New York; Jessica Reed, Danville, Indiana; Jennifer A. Reimer, Graz, Austria; Jennifer Soong, Highland Park, New Jersey; Jennifer Stella, San Francisco, California

 

Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Poetry Contest

2021 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Poetry Contest — #1,000 (March 1–April 30, 2021)—Judge: Thylias Moss

Note: This contest has been extended from an original deadline of April 19 to the current deadline of April 30.

The winner of the Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Poetry Contest wins an immediate cash prize of $1,000, letterpress publication of the broadside by Omnidawn, 50 free copies of the broadside, and publication of the winning poem in the Omniverse online journal.

For those of you who are not familiar with "Broadsides" here is the Wikipedia definition for the term "Broadside (printing)":

"A broadside is a large sheet of paper printed on one side only. Historically, broadsides were posters, announcing events or proclamations, or simply advertisements. Today, broadside printing is done by many smaller printers and publishers as a fine art variant, with poems often being available as broadsides, intended to be framed and hung on the wall."—Wikipedia

Omnidawn's poetry broadsides, like other fine art poetry broadsides, are done with an old fashioned letter press, which uses an inked raised surface directly applied to sheets of paper. Letterpress printing was the type of printing originally invented by Gutenberg about 1450. The letters created by this method are slightly raised on the paper by the impression made with the raised type. Such poetry broadsides are highly prized and collected within the poetry community.

To view details below about the previous winners of the Omnidawn Poetry Broadside Contest click here.

 

Guidelines for Single Poem Broadside Contest

  1. Omnidawn seeks a wide range of styles, approaches, forms, diversities, and aesthetics to send to the judge (for example: lyric, prose poems, experimental, etc.).
  2. There are no citizenship requirements or limitations. Postal and online submissions are accepted from around the world.
  3. We recommend that poems be between 8 and 24 lines in length, with blank lines used as stanza breaks each counting as a line. The title line and the blank line following are not counted in this 8 to 24 line recommendation. Poems that are outside this recommended size are still completely eligible. but may require special formatting and/or smaller type to fit well on the finished broadside.
  4. If you submit more than one poem we recommend that you begin each poem at the top of a new page and precede each poem with the words "POEM 1," "POEM 2," "POEM 3," and so on to make it very clear to our editors where one poem ends and another begins.
  5. Poems must be in English, although it is perfectly acceptable to include some text in other languages.
  6. Poem submissions for all contests must be original. (If you include quotes from other works in your poem, please be sure they are clearly attributed to the author at the bottom of the poem.
  7. Simultaneous submissions to other contests and multiple submissions to this or other Omnidawn contests are perfectly acceptable. You DO NOT have to notify us if your manuscript is taken elsewhere. Instead, we will verify with you that the manuscript is still available if you are close to being chosen as a winner.
  8. Poems must be previously unpublished in any form. Therefore, poems that have been previously published in print or online web magazines, journals, books (including self-published books) or on a personal web site are ineligible.
  9. Any photographs or other graphic images submitted with the poems will not be considered as part of the poem submission. You can include photographs and graphics in your poem, but because these can cause problems with high quality letter press printing, photographic or other graphics will not be considered for inclusion in the winning poem. Only the text you submit will be considered.
  10. This contest is Identity-Hidden (formerly referred to as blind), so any information in your poem that could identify you, such as your name, will be removed before the poem is passed on to our readers. If you use your name within your poem please substitute a pseudonym and state at the bottom of the poem that this name is a pseudonym that is not your real name. If you win the contest the pseudonym will be replaced with your real name when we publish the broadside.
  11. Revisions are not allowed to a poem after it has been submitted to the contest. However, the winning poet will have time to revise the poem before publication. We do reserve the right to get approval from the judge if those revisions are significant. For further details click here.
  12. NOT ELIGIBLE are translations; collaborations by more than one author; students, colleagues, or close friends of the judge, Omnidawn past and present staff and interns; and authors of books or broadsides Omnidawn has published. If you win this contest you are still eligible to enter and win one of Omnidawn's book contests.
  13. The entry fee is $10 for the first poem and $5 for each additional poem if you submit all your poems as a single file or postal submission. This is less expensive than entering them one at a time at $10 each, although you can certainly submit as many additional poems as you choose at any time after your initial submission. The web site for online submissions can accept up to 6 poems at $10 for the first poem and $5 for each additional poem up to a maximum of 6 poems, but we can accept more than 6 poems in one submission. Simply select the number of poems you want to submit in the drop down menu on the submission page. If you wish to submit more than 6 poems simply submit all the poems you want in a single file, select the option for the maximum of 6 poems that the submission form will accept, and we will send you an email invoice that you can pay with a credit card at $5 each for any poems above the 6 that you have already paid for on the web site.
  14. Online entries must be received and postal entries must be postmarked between March 1 and April 30, 2020 at midnight Pacific Daylight Time.
  15. The 2020 winner will be announced to our Email list and on this web page in August 2020, and we expect to publish the winning poem in October 2020.

Errors in Your Submission. If our staff find a serious error in your entry (your manuscript file won't open, is locked so we cannot remove identifying info, is unreadable, your credit card info is incorrect or your payment is missing, etc.) we will contact you to obtain a correction at no cost to you, so your error will not disqualify you. Nor will a few smaller errors in your poems, including spelling, punctuation, formatting, or typographic errors, reduce your chances of winning. (We fully understand that such errors sometimes occur for everyone, and that these can be easily corrected later.)

You can enter one or more poems from March 1 to April 30, 2020 or you can choose to receive alerts about upcoming contest deadlines immediately below.

 

WHEN YOU ARE READY TO ENTER you have three options:

  1. If you want to read helpful additional details below and then go to the postal or online submission procedures, you can: Click here for helpful additional details and submission procedures.
  2. You can go directly to the concise POSTAL submission procedure below by clicking here.
  3. OR, you can go directly to the concise ONLINE submission procedure on the submission web page by clicking here, or paste the following link into your browser:     www.omnidawn.com/submissions1

 

OR, if you would like to receive alerts about upcoming contest deadlines (and, if you choose, other Omnidawn emails), you can: Click here to add yourself to our mailing list. (Your email address will not be shared with anyone, and you can easily remove yourself from the mailing list at any time.)

 

Additional Details for the Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Contest

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

The Most Important Requirements

  1. Check the eligibility requirements (described under the heading in red letters immediately above: "Guidelines for Single Poem Broadside Contest").
  2. Make sure that you are fully satisfied with your poem(s) (because revisions are not allowed during the contest).
  3. Submit your entry by the deadline.
  4. When submitting make sure that you have provided correct contact information so that we can reach you approximately 2 to 3 months after the contest closes. We urge you to include various means of contacting you, including as many phone numbers, email addresses, and postal addresses as you like. We will use all of these to contact you if necessary, but if we cannot reach you within a three week period, we will be unable to award you the prize. (If you like, you can provide alternate contact info such as additional phone numbers, Email addresses, and postal addresses. For online entries these can be added to the "Comments" field. For postal entries these can be added to the title page along with your primary contact information.)

 

How We Judge: Identifying Info is Removed, Then Poems are Read by Two Editors

Omnidawn abides by The CLMP Code of Ethics. The Community of Literary Magazines and Presses’ organization of independent literary publishers believes that ethical contests serve our shared goal: to connect writers and readers by publishing exceptional writing. We believe that intent to act ethically, clarity of guidelines, and transparency of process form the foundation of an ethical contest. To that end, we agree to 1) conduct our contests as ethically as possible and to address any unethical behavior on the part of our staff, editors, or judges; 2) to provide clear and specific contest guidelines — defining conflict of interest for all parties involved; and 3) to make the mechanics of our selection process available to the public. This Code recognizes that different contest models produce different results, but that each model can be run ethically. We have adopted this Code to reinforce our integrity and dedication as a publishing community and to ensure that our contests contribute to a vibrant literary heritage.

Any identifying information will be removed from all poem(s) before they are sent to the readers who choose the semi-finalists to be sent to the judge. All poem files will be given a number to associate them with the contact information of their submitters. Any Omnidawn staff members who make contact with the entrants or who remove the identifying information from poem(s) are NOT involved in the reading or selection of poems.

All poems will then be read by at least two different readers. These readers will not have access to the identities of the submitters. For the sake of avoiding any conflict of interest, if an editor believes that he/she recognizes the work of a colleague, student, or friend, then that poem is given to another editor. The editors then meet as a group to select the semi-finalists to be sent to the judge. If the judge wishes to see additional poems, she or he may request them; the judge is not, however, permitted to request specific poems. Colleagues, students, and close friends of the judge are not eligible to compete. Past or present Omnidawn staff and interns and authors previously published by Omnidawn are also not eligible to compete. The judge is not allowed to choose manuscripts that present a conflict of interest.

 

How and When We Announce the Winner and Finalists

Approximately three months after the contest ends, the judge selects the winner and five finalists (with no ranking of the finalists) and informs the Omnidawn staff, who then verify that the winner or finalists are not students, colleagues, or close friends of the judge. Omnidawn then notifies the winner and verifies that the requirements of the contest have been met. If so, a contract is immediately mailed to the winner. The contract certifies that the winning poem is an original work by the author, that the author is not a student, colleague, or close friend of the judge, and that Omnidawn has the right to print and sell the broadsides. All other rights to the winning poem including the copyright are retained by the author. When Omnidawn receives the signed contract back from the winner, a check for $1,000 is immediately mailed to the winner. At this point the winner and finalists are publicly announced in emails to all entrants who provided an email address, on the www.omnidawn.com web site, and on social media. The broadside will be designed and will appear in Omniverse, Omnidawn's online journal about two months after the winner is announced.

Revisions to the Winning Poem

The winning poet will have the opportunity to make revisions to the winning poem. However, revisions can result in a poem that is very different from the one the judge has chosen. Given that the judge's name is attached to the winning poem, it is only fair to the judge and to the spirit of the contest that revisions that have the potential to significantly change the meaning or effect of the poem must be approved by the judge.

In our experience the vast majority of the edits that winners have proposed are relatively small and do not change the poem significantly. It has been rare that we have felt a need to submit such changes to the judge for approval. If the judge does not approve the new poem and the winner agrees to publish the poem as it was originally entered in the contest that winning poem will remain the winner, but if publishing the poem without the poet’s new revisions is unacceptable to the poet, then the poet can choose to decline the prize.

 

Two Submission Options

Option 1: Submit on our secure web site. (Most submissions are via our online submission web site. This is usually the easiest way to submit.)

Option 2: Submit via postal mail.

Procedures for each of these options are listed in detail below.

 

Option 1: Procedure to submit on our secure online submission web site.

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

  1. If you have any questions send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or telephone (510) 237-5472. Normally, if we can’t take your call immediately, we can usually call you back within 30 minutes.
  2. The Omnidawn web site is protected by 2048 bit SSL encryption and Sitelock anti-virus and anti-malware protection for the highest level of security. In addition, no Omnidawn staff can ever view your credit card information, which is only available to our credit card processor, PayPal.
  3. If you experience a problem submitting online, there is a section at the end of this online submission procedure to help you resolve the problem. Only about one to two percent of our online entrants experience a problem submitting.
  4. You will find the link to direct you to the submissions web page at the end of this procedure.
  5. Since you provide contact information on our web site you do not need to put your name or contact information on your poem(s). We prefer that you not include a bio, cover letter, or headers or footers that include your name, but you will not be disqualified for including such info. Please note that all identifying information, will be removed from the copy of the poem file that is sent to Omnidawn readers and to the judge.
  6. You will be able to upload your poems on the submissions page. Poems must be sent in one file, not multiple files. Poem files must be in PDF, RTF, or Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX format only. Files without a .pdf, rtf, .doc, or .docx extension cannot be uploaded. Most word processing programs can save files as .RTF (Rich Text Format) by going to FILE—SAVE AS, and then choosing RTF (Rich Text Format) in the FORMAT drop-down box.
  7. If you HAVE previously entered an Omnidawn contest, either online or via postal mail, you probably already have an account, and you will not be able to create another account using the same Email address. However, you will be able to logon to that account using that Email address. When you go to the secure online submissions page you can log in using the box on the upper left by entering your Email address and your password. If you don’t have your password, click “need help” below the login button, and you can update your password, or you can Email or phone us and we can give you a new password. Once you are logged in you can click “submit your work” in the new box on your left, which will take you to a secure web page to submit a new poem file and enter credit card information. (Contact information is retained in our database, but credit card numbers are not.)
  8. If you HAVE NOT previously entered an Omnidawn contest, when you go to our secure online submission page, you will be asked to enter your credit card billing and contact information, the title of your peoms, and an 8-20 character password of your choice. (Contact information is retained in our database, but credit card numbers are not.)
  9. If you use a pen name, or if the poet’s name differs from the name on the credit card, or if you are submitting for someone else, please list the pen name or poet’s name in the writer name field, and put your credit card billing name and information in the other fields. 
  10. For this broadside competition, in the “genre” field you can use the up-down arrow keys to choose the number of poems you are submitting ($10 for the first poem and $5 for each additional poem up to 6 poems:
    (1) You can choose to pay just reading fee of $10 to submit one poem. (This is the default, so if you do not use the drop-down arrow keys for this field, this is the choice you will make.)
    (2) Or you can choose to pay $15 for two poems.
    (3) Or you can choose to pay $20 for three poems.
    (4) Or you can choose to pay $25 for four poems.
    (5) Or you can choose to pay $30 for five poems.
    (5) Or you can choose to pay $35 for six poems.
    (If you wish to submit more than 6 poems simply submit all the poems you want in a single file, select the option for the maximum of 6 poems the submission form will accept, and we will send you an email invoice that you can pay with a credit card at $5 each for any poems above the 6 that you have already paid for on the web site.)
  11. To complete the "file" field click the "Browse" or "Choose File" button to find the manuscript file on your computer. (Some browsers use the word "Browse" and others use the words "Choose File.") Select that file and click the Open or Choose button. (Some browsers use "Open" while others use "Choose.") The name of your file will then appear in the "file" field.
  12. Fill in your credit card information. Note that credit card info goes directly to our payment processor and is not available to anyone at Omnidawn.
  13. Please DO use the “comments” field at the bottom of the online submissions page to provide any other information you would like us to know such as alternate phone numbers, Email addresses, or mailing addresses, and to provide feedback about your experience submitting to this contest. We are always trying to simplify and improve the submissions process, so your feedback will be very helpful to us. Note that any personal publication history or other information intended for our editors or the judge is irrelevant here because these comments will only be read by staff who are NOT involved in the selection process.
  14. To complete your entry click "submit" and a new screen will appear so you can check to make sure that your information is correct. When you are satisfied that it is correct click "continue" and your entry will be submitted.
  15. When your entry is received a new screen will appear that states [submission successfully received] and you should also immediately receive an automatic email confirmation. Within 3 days we will verify your contact info and send you a second email with a copy of the file with poems that you submitted so that you can see that we received it successfully.
  16. If your credit card is not accepted (usually a typo issue) we will email you directions on how to resolve the issue.
  17. You do not need to let us know if one of the poems you have submitted to this contest has been accepted elsewhere. (With our book contests it is important to let us know if your book manuscript is accepted elsewhere because that can save us a lot of time reading the manuscript, but it takes more time to withdraw a poem from your entry than it does to read it, so there is no time savings involved and therefore there is no need to inform us. If the withdrawn poem is chosen as the winner we will simply have to select the runner up.)
  18. If you want to submit additional work, update your contact info or password, or view your submissions you can login at the end of this process or in the future using the Email address.

       If you experience a problem submitting online

About one to two percent of our online entrants experience a problem with their online submission. Below the main problem of which we are aware and the ways to resolve it. (If you discover a new problem, please let us know so we can post it here, hopefully with a solution.)

  1. If when you click “Continue” you receive a message that your your credit card is NOT accepted (usually because of a typo) your contact information and poem file still will have been uploaded to our database so that we have everything we need except your payment. You can resolve this issue in one of two ways. (If this happens we will also send you the following instructions in an Email):
    (A) Mail a check for the reading fee to the address at the bottom of this web page. Please write your email address and the title of your poems on your check (or money order, which is also acceptable). We will send you an email confirming that your poem file has been entered into the contest when your check arrives.
    OR
    (B) Enter your credit card info again by going to www.omnidawn.com/submissions1 and using the box on the left to log in using the email address and password you just entered. A screen will appear displaying the contact info you have entered with a record showing the entry you just submitted. In the second field of that record click on the words “pay now” and a secure screen will appear so that you can enter your credit card information again. If successful you will receive an immediate notification of success and an email stating that your submission has been entered into the contest. If your credit card still does not work you can still use option (A) above by mailing a check.

         To go to the ONLINE contest submission web page and its concise procedures click here, or paste the following link into your browser:     www.omnidawn.com/submissions1

 

 

Option 2: Procedure to submit broadside entries via postal mail

We suggest you read at least the bold type in the directions below. Reading the non-bold type is optional.

If you have any questions send an Email to submissions@omnidawn.com or telephone (510) 237-5472. Normally, if we can’t take your call immediately, we can usually call you back within 30 minutes.

Please DO NOT send Fed Ex, UPS, or signature required US Post Office envelopes. The post office often has difficulty obtaining a signature at our offices, and there is a high likelihood such envelopes will be returned to you.

Note that if you send a cover letter, acknowledgements, or bio these will be removed before your poem or poems are read.

Please enclose the following:

1. One title page with your name, contact information, and if this is your first Omnidawn contest, please also tell us where you learned about our contest (to the best of your recollection). Please include your mailing address, phone number, and Email address if you have one. (Alternate contact info, such as additional phone numbers, Email addresses, or mailing addresses can also be added here if you like.)

2. Your poems on one or more pages.

3. For this broadside contest, include a check or money order made out to "OMNIDAWN PUBLISHING." It is very important that the check be made out to "OMNIDAWN PUBLISHING." Make the check out for the reading fee of $10 for one poem, $15 for two poems, $20 for three poems, $25 for four poems, $30 for five poems, or $35 for six poems. (You can send more than six poems by enclosing a check for $10 for the first poem and an additdionsl $5 for each additional poem.)

5. All poems will be deleted or recycled at the end of the contest. For entries sent by postal mail, please do NOT send an SASE for return of the poems.

6. (Optional) A self-addressed stamped postcard and/or a standard sized SASE. You may, if you choose, include a self-addressed stamped postcard, and we will mail this back to you to verify that your manuscript has been received. You may also enclose a standard size SASE and we will use this to send you information on the winner and finalists when these are determined.

 

Send postal submissions via standard First Class Mail or Priority Mail to:

Omnidawn Poetry Broadside Contest
Omnidawn Publishing
1632 Elm Avenue
Richmond, CA 94805-1614

 

       Previous Winners — Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Contest

         The 2021 winner will be announced in August 2021.

Ae_Hee_Lee

Winner — 2020 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Prize — Judge: Jennifer S. Cheng

Ae Hee Lee — Poem Title: "(Dis)Ambiguation"

Born in South Korea and raised in Peru, Ae Hee Lee received her MFA from the University of Notre Dame and her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her poetry has been published or is forthcoming at the Georgia Review, New England Review, Southeast Review, Poetry Magazine, and The Adroit Journal among others. She is the author of two chapbooks: Bedtime//Riverbed (Compound Press, 2017) and Dear bear, (Platypus Press, 2021).

The Finalists of the 2020 Single Poem Broadside Contest chosen by Jennifer S. Cheng are (in alphabetical order by last name): Sarah Audsley, Johnson, Vermont; Keith Jones, Boston, Massachusetts; Nilufar Karimi, Denver, Colorado; Carolann Madden, Houston, Texas, and Keith Wilson, Chicago, Illinois.

 

Toby Altman

Winner — 2019 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Prize — Judge: Dan Beachy-Quick

Toby Altman — Poem Title: "Some critics have taken..."

Toby Altman is the author of Arcadia, Indiana (Plays Inverse, 2017) and several chapbooks, including Every Hospital by Bertrand Goldberg (Except One), winner of the 2018 Ghost Proposal Chapbook Contest. His poems can be found in Gulf Coast, jubilat, Lana Turner, and other journals and anthologies. He holds a PhD in English from Northwestern University and an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

The Finalists of the 2019 Single Poem Broadside Contest chosen by Dan Beachy-Quick are (in alphabetical order by last name): Lillian-Yvonne Bertram, Lowell, Massachusetts; James Knippen, Clinton, New York; A.D. Lauren-Abunassar, Iowa City, Iowa; Kathryn Petruccelli, Florence, Massachusetts; and Abi Pollokoff, Seattle, Washington.

 

C.S. Carrier

Winner — 2018 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Prize — Judge: Dean Rader

C. S. Carrier — Poem Title: "The Natural State"

C.S. Carrier is the author of After Dayton and Mantle, as well as several chapbooks. His poems have been published in numerous journals including inter|rupture, Fence, and douse. He has received grants and fellowships from the Juniper Summer Writing Institute, the Arkansas Arts Council, and the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism. He has an MFA from the Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a PhD from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He lives in Clarksville, Arkansas.

The Finalists of the 2018 Single Poem Broadside Contest chosen by Dean Rader are (in alphabetical order by last name): Jeremy Casabella, Bakersfield, California; Nava EtShalom, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Sara Key, New York, New York; Christopher Phelps, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Lou Sayre, Sebastopol, Calicornia. .

 

Beatrice Szymkowiak

Winner — 2017 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Prize — Judge: Craig Santos Perez

Beatrice Szymkowiak — Poem Title: "Yangtze Baiji Expedition Log"

Beatrice Szymkowiak is a French-American author. Exploratory and experimental, her poetry investigates the new environmental trajectory of the anthropocene. Her poems have been published in magazines including the Berkeley Poetry Review and Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review. Red Zone, a first chapbook, is forthcoming in Fall 2018. Beatrice graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts in May 2017. She currently lives and teaches in Portland, Oregon.

The Finalists of the 2017 Single Poem Broadside Contest chosen by Craig Santos Perez are (in alphabetical order by last name): Danielle Blau, Ridgewood, New York; C. S. Carrier, Clarksville, Arkansas; Kelly Hoffer, Ithaca, New York; Cori A. Winrock, Salt Lake City, Utah; and Marco Yan, Tsing Yi, Hong Kong. .

 

Anca Roncea

Winner — 2016 Omnidawn Single Poem Broadside Prize — Judge: Norma Cole

Anca Roncea — Poem Title: "Turns"

Anca Roncea is a poet and translator. She is a recent graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the University of Iowa's MFA program in Literary Translation. She completed her undergraduate education at the University of Bucharest in Modern Greek and English and followed that with an MA in American Culture. She has been a Fulbright visiting scholar at the Univerity of California, Berkeley. She was born and raised in Romania where she wrote and translated poems, working on an experimental translation of Tristan Tzara as poetry. Her work can be found in the Berkeley Poetry Review, Beecher's, and The Des Moines Register.

The Finalists of the 2016 Single Poem Broadside Contest chosen by Norma Cole are (in alphabetical order by last name): Rosa Alcala, El Paso, Texas; Lillian-Yvonne Bertram, Lowell, Massachusetts; C. S. Carrier, Clarksville, Arkansas; Marco Maisto, Woodside, New York, and Anna Morrison, Los Gatos, California.

 

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